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Title: Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002

Abstract

Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15004460
Report Number(s):
NREL/SR-500-33249
XAM 9-29211-01; TRN: US1005174
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Work performed by University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; ANIMALS; BIRDS; ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY; MINIMIZATION; OPTICS; PERFORMANCE; TURBINES; VELOCITY; WIND TURBINES; COLLISIONS; WIND ENERGY; AVIAN; AVIAN COLLISIONS; MOTION SMEAR; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Hodos, W. Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/15004460.
Hodos, W. Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002. United States. doi:10.2172/15004460.
Hodos, W. Fri . "Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002". United States. doi:10.2172/15004460. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15004460.
@article{osti_15004460,
title = {Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002},
author = {Hodos, W},
abstractNote = {Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."},
doi = {10.2172/15004460},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {8}
}

Technical Report:

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