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Title: Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324

Abstract

With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured whenmore » they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items do not take a lot of work, but require an awareness of the risks involved in not doing them or doing them incorrectly. The security of home networks and communications with company networks can be significantly improved by adding an appropriate software or hardware firewall to the home network and using a protected protocol such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), a Virtual Private Network (VPN), or Secure Shell (SSH) for connecting to the company network.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15002750
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-151130
TRN: US200418%%87
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 27 Nov 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMMUNICATIONS; COMPUTERS; INTERNET; PERSONNEL; SECURITY; THEFT

Citation Formats

Orvis, W J, Krystosek, P, and Smith, J. Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/15002750.
Orvis, W J, Krystosek, P, & Smith, J. Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324. United States. doi:10.2172/15002750.
Orvis, W J, Krystosek, P, and Smith, J. Wed . "Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324". United States. doi:10.2172/15002750. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15002750.
@article{osti_15002750,
title = {Connecting to the Internet Securely; Protecting Home Networks CIAC-2324},
author = {Orvis, W J and Krystosek, P and Smith, J},
abstractNote = {With more and more people working at home and connecting to company networks via the Internet, the risk to company networks to intrusion and theft of sensitive information is growing. Working from home has many positive advantages for both the home worker and the company they work for. However, as companies encourage people to work from home, they need to start considering the interaction of the employee's home network and the company network he connects to. This paper discusses problems and solutions related to protection of home computers from attacks on those computers via the network connection. It does not consider protection of those systems from people who have physical access to the computers nor does it consider company laptops taken on-the-road. Home networks are often targeted by intruders because they are plentiful and they are usually not well secured. While companies have departments of professionals to maintain and secure their networks, home networks are maintained by the employee who may be less knowledgeable about network security matters. The biggest problems with home networks are that: Home networks are not designed to be secure and may use technologies (wireless) that are not secure; The operating systems are not secured when they are installed; The operating systems and applications are not maintained (for security considerations) after they are installed; and The networks are often used for other activities that put them at risk for being compromised. Home networks that are going to be connected to company networks need to be cooperatively secured by the employee and the company so they do not open up the company network to intruders. Securing home networks involves many of the same operations as securing a company network: Patch and maintain systems; Securely configure systems; Eliminate unneeded services; Protect remote logins; Use good passwords; Use current antivirus software; and Moderate your Internet usage habits. Most of these items do not take a lot of work, but require an awareness of the risks involved in not doing them or doing them incorrectly. The security of home networks and communications with company networks can be significantly improved by adding an appropriate software or hardware firewall to the home network and using a protected protocol such as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), a Virtual Private Network (VPN), or Secure Shell (SSH) for connecting to the company network.},
doi = {10.2172/15002750},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {11}
}

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