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Title: Vertical Mixing and Chemistry Over an Arid Urban Site: First Results from Aircraft Observations Made During the Phoenix Sunrise Campaign

Abstract

A central goal of the Phoenix 2001 Field Campaign was to study vertical mixing with the onset of convection and to quantify the effect of this mixing on chemistry within an urban boundary layer. As part of this study, a series of low altitude aircraft sampling flights were made over the Greater Phoenix area between June 16-30, 2001. The resulting observations, in conjunction with a series of surface measurements and meteorological observations, are being used to study the vertical transport and reactivity of ozone and ozone-precursors shortly after sunrise. A typical flight began with sampling in the residual boundary layer of the preceding afternoon, showing a large vertical gradient in both chemical and meteorological species. With the development of the convective boundary layer, these gradients disappeared, and a more uniform value was found at all altitudes in the more slowly reacting species. Ozone levels were typically observed to be greatest aloft during the early morning hour s, with values typically twice those found near the surfaces. NOy was inversely related to ozone at the start of the flights, as would be expected from the O3+ NO reaction, suggesting the upward mixing of NOx rich air with the downward transport ofmore » NOx-poor, O3 rich air. The timing of the development of the convective boundary layer, as measured by the weakening of chemical stratification, appeared to be related to the intensity of the residual nocturnal stable layer.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15002665
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-35414
KP1202010; TRN: US200418%%50
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fourth Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry: Urban, Regional, and Global Scale Impacts of Air Pollutants, Conference location not provided, Conference dates not provided; Other Information: PBD: 17 Jan 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR; AIRCRAFT; ALTITUDE; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; BOUNDARY LAYERS; CHEMISTRY; CONVECTION; OZONE; POLLUTANTS; SAMPLING; STRATIFICATION; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Berkowitz, Carl M, Springston, Stephen R, Doran, J Christopher, and Fast, Jerome D. Vertical Mixing and Chemistry Over an Arid Urban Site: First Results from Aircraft Observations Made During the Phoenix Sunrise Campaign. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Berkowitz, Carl M, Springston, Stephen R, Doran, J Christopher, & Fast, Jerome D. Vertical Mixing and Chemistry Over an Arid Urban Site: First Results from Aircraft Observations Made During the Phoenix Sunrise Campaign. United States.
Berkowitz, Carl M, Springston, Stephen R, Doran, J Christopher, and Fast, Jerome D. Thu . "Vertical Mixing and Chemistry Over an Arid Urban Site: First Results from Aircraft Observations Made During the Phoenix Sunrise Campaign". United States.
@article{osti_15002665,
title = {Vertical Mixing and Chemistry Over an Arid Urban Site: First Results from Aircraft Observations Made During the Phoenix Sunrise Campaign},
author = {Berkowitz, Carl M and Springston, Stephen R and Doran, J Christopher and Fast, Jerome D},
abstractNote = {A central goal of the Phoenix 2001 Field Campaign was to study vertical mixing with the onset of convection and to quantify the effect of this mixing on chemistry within an urban boundary layer. As part of this study, a series of low altitude aircraft sampling flights were made over the Greater Phoenix area between June 16-30, 2001. The resulting observations, in conjunction with a series of surface measurements and meteorological observations, are being used to study the vertical transport and reactivity of ozone and ozone-precursors shortly after sunrise. A typical flight began with sampling in the residual boundary layer of the preceding afternoon, showing a large vertical gradient in both chemical and meteorological species. With the development of the convective boundary layer, these gradients disappeared, and a more uniform value was found at all altitudes in the more slowly reacting species. Ozone levels were typically observed to be greatest aloft during the early morning hour s, with values typically twice those found near the surfaces. NOy was inversely related to ozone at the start of the flights, as would be expected from the O3+ NO reaction, suggesting the upward mixing of NOx rich air with the downward transport of NOx-poor, O3 rich air. The timing of the development of the convective boundary layer, as measured by the weakening of chemical stratification, appeared to be related to the intensity of the residual nocturnal stable layer.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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