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Title: Effect of Regional-Scale Transport on Oxidants in the Vicinity of Philadelphia During the 1999 NE-OPS Field Campaign

Abstract

A new meteorological-chemical modeling system is used to determine the relative contribution of regional-scale transport and local photochemical production on air quality over Philadelphia. The model performance is evaluated using surface and airborne meteorological and chemical measurements made during a 30-day period in July and August of 1999 as part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NE-OPS). Good agreement between the simulations and observations was obtained. The bias in the vicinity of Philadelphia over the simulation period was -5.8 ppb for the peak ozone mixing ratio during the day and 2.0 ppb for the minimum ozone mixing ratio at night. Layers of ozone above the convective boundary layer were measured by both research aircraft and ozonesondes during the morning between 09 and 11 EDT. The modeling system demonstrates that upwind vertical mixing processes the previous afternoon, subsequent horizontal transport aloft, and depletion of ozone by NO titration within the stable boundary layer at night lead to the development of these layers. Ozone aloft was then entrained into the growing convective boundary, contributing to surface ozone concentrations. Through a series of sensitivity studies, we find that most of the ozone is the result of emissions in the vicinity of Philadelphiamore » and Chesapeake Bay area, but up to 30-40% of the ozone during high-ozone episodes was due to transport from upwind sources. Local emissions and meteorological conditions were largely responsible for one high-ozone episode because of light winds.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15002422
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-35004
Journal ID: ISSN 0148--0227; KP1202010; TRN: US201102%%655
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. D. (Atmospheres), 107(D16)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 107; Journal Issue: D16; Journal ID: ISSN 0148--0227
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR QUALITY; AIRCRAFT; BOUNDARY LAYERS; CHESAPEAKE BAY; MIXING RATIO; OXIDIZERS; OZONE; PARTICULATES; PERFORMANCE; PRODUCTION; SENSITIVITY; SIMULATION; TITRATION; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Fast, Jerome D, Zaveri, Rahul A, Bian, Randy X, Chapman, Elaine G, and Easter, Richard C. Effect of Regional-Scale Transport on Oxidants in the Vicinity of Philadelphia During the 1999 NE-OPS Field Campaign. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.1029/2001JD000980.
Fast, Jerome D, Zaveri, Rahul A, Bian, Randy X, Chapman, Elaine G, & Easter, Richard C. Effect of Regional-Scale Transport on Oxidants in the Vicinity of Philadelphia During the 1999 NE-OPS Field Campaign. United States. doi:10.1029/2001JD000980.
Fast, Jerome D, Zaveri, Rahul A, Bian, Randy X, Chapman, Elaine G, and Easter, Richard C. Wed . "Effect of Regional-Scale Transport on Oxidants in the Vicinity of Philadelphia During the 1999 NE-OPS Field Campaign". United States. doi:10.1029/2001JD000980.
@article{osti_15002422,
title = {Effect of Regional-Scale Transport on Oxidants in the Vicinity of Philadelphia During the 1999 NE-OPS Field Campaign},
author = {Fast, Jerome D and Zaveri, Rahul A and Bian, Randy X and Chapman, Elaine G and Easter, Richard C},
abstractNote = {A new meteorological-chemical modeling system is used to determine the relative contribution of regional-scale transport and local photochemical production on air quality over Philadelphia. The model performance is evaluated using surface and airborne meteorological and chemical measurements made during a 30-day period in July and August of 1999 as part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NE-OPS). Good agreement between the simulations and observations was obtained. The bias in the vicinity of Philadelphia over the simulation period was -5.8 ppb for the peak ozone mixing ratio during the day and 2.0 ppb for the minimum ozone mixing ratio at night. Layers of ozone above the convective boundary layer were measured by both research aircraft and ozonesondes during the morning between 09 and 11 EDT. The modeling system demonstrates that upwind vertical mixing processes the previous afternoon, subsequent horizontal transport aloft, and depletion of ozone by NO titration within the stable boundary layer at night lead to the development of these layers. Ozone aloft was then entrained into the growing convective boundary, contributing to surface ozone concentrations. Through a series of sensitivity studies, we find that most of the ozone is the result of emissions in the vicinity of Philadelphia and Chesapeake Bay area, but up to 30-40% of the ozone during high-ozone episodes was due to transport from upwind sources. Local emissions and meteorological conditions were largely responsible for one high-ozone episode because of light winds.},
doi = {10.1029/2001JD000980},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. D. (Atmospheres), 107(D16)},
issn = {0148--0227},
number = D16,
volume = 107,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {8}
}