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Title: Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuels via Indirect Liquefaction, Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrothermal Liquefaction, Combined Algal Processing, and Biochemical Conversion: Update of the 2018 State-of-Technology Cases and Design Cases

Abstract

This technical report describes the SCSAs for the production of renewable hydrocarbon transportation fuels via a range of conversion technologies: (1) renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of woody lignocellulosic biomass (note that the IDL pathway in this SCSA represents the syngas conversion design in the 2018 SOT and 2022 design cases [Tan et al., 2018]); (2) renewable gasoline (RG) and diesel (RD) blendstocks via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of woody lignocellulosic biomass; (3) RD via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of wet sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; (4) renewable hydrocarbon fuels via biochemical conversion of herbaceous lignocellulosic biomass; (5) renewable diesel via HTL of a blend of algae and woody biomass; and (6) renewable diesel via combined algae processing (CAP). This technical report focuses on the environmental performance of these six biofuel production pathways in their 2018 SOT cases, as well as in their design cases (future target projections). The results of these renewable hydrocarbon fuel pathways in these SCSA analyses update those for the respective 2015 and 2016 SOT cases (Edward Frank et al. 2016; Hao Cai et al. 2016, 2017; Cai et al. 2018) in the case of IDL, algae CAP, and biochemical conversionmore » pathways. They also provide an opportunity to examine the impact of technology improvements in both biomass feedstock production and biofuel production that have been achieved in 2018 SOTs on the sustainability performance of these renewable transportation fuels, and they reflect updates to Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model, which was released in October 2018 (Wang et al. 2018). These GREET updates include production of natural gas, electricity, and petroleum-based fuels that can influence biofuels’ supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) (CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions, water consumption and air pollutant emissions. GHG emissions, water consumption, and 2 nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions are the main sustainability metrics assessed in this analysis. In this analysis, we define water consumption as the amount of water withdrawn from a freshwater source that is not returned (or returnable) to a freshwater source at the same level of quality. Life-cycle fossil energy consumption and net energy balance, which is the life-cycle fossil energy consumption deducted from the renewable biofuel energy produced, are also assessed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ; ; ; ; ; ;
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy System Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Transportation Office. Bioenergy Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1499023
Report Number(s):
ANL/ESD-18/13
149543
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cai, Hao, Benavides, Thathiana, Lee, Uisung, Wang, Michael, Tan, Eric, Davis, Ryan, Dutta, Abhijit, Biddy, Mary, Clippinger, Jennifer, Grundl, Nicholas, Tao, Ling, Hartley, Damon, Roni, Mohammad, Thompson, David, Snowden-Swan, Lesley, Zhu, Yunhua, and Jones, Susanne. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuels via Indirect Liquefaction, Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrothermal Liquefaction, Combined Algal Processing, and Biochemical Conversion: Update of the 2018 State-of-Technology Cases and Design Cases. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1499023.
Cai, Hao, Benavides, Thathiana, Lee, Uisung, Wang, Michael, Tan, Eric, Davis, Ryan, Dutta, Abhijit, Biddy, Mary, Clippinger, Jennifer, Grundl, Nicholas, Tao, Ling, Hartley, Damon, Roni, Mohammad, Thompson, David, Snowden-Swan, Lesley, Zhu, Yunhua, & Jones, Susanne. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuels via Indirect Liquefaction, Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrothermal Liquefaction, Combined Algal Processing, and Biochemical Conversion: Update of the 2018 State-of-Technology Cases and Design Cases. United States. doi:10.2172/1499023.
Cai, Hao, Benavides, Thathiana, Lee, Uisung, Wang, Michael, Tan, Eric, Davis, Ryan, Dutta, Abhijit, Biddy, Mary, Clippinger, Jennifer, Grundl, Nicholas, Tao, Ling, Hartley, Damon, Roni, Mohammad, Thompson, David, Snowden-Swan, Lesley, Zhu, Yunhua, and Jones, Susanne. Sat . "Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuels via Indirect Liquefaction, Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrothermal Liquefaction, Combined Algal Processing, and Biochemical Conversion: Update of the 2018 State-of-Technology Cases and Design Cases". United States. doi:10.2172/1499023. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1499023.
@article{osti_1499023,
title = {Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Renewable Hydrocarbon Fuels via Indirect Liquefaction, Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrothermal Liquefaction, Combined Algal Processing, and Biochemical Conversion: Update of the 2018 State-of-Technology Cases and Design Cases},
author = {Cai, Hao and Benavides, Thathiana and Lee, Uisung and Wang, Michael and Tan, Eric and Davis, Ryan and Dutta, Abhijit and Biddy, Mary and Clippinger, Jennifer and Grundl, Nicholas and Tao, Ling and Hartley, Damon and Roni, Mohammad and Thompson, David and Snowden-Swan, Lesley and Zhu, Yunhua and Jones, Susanne},
abstractNote = {This technical report describes the SCSAs for the production of renewable hydrocarbon transportation fuels via a range of conversion technologies: (1) renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of woody lignocellulosic biomass (note that the IDL pathway in this SCSA represents the syngas conversion design in the 2018 SOT and 2022 design cases [Tan et al., 2018]); (2) renewable gasoline (RG) and diesel (RD) blendstocks via ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of woody lignocellulosic biomass; (3) RD via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of wet sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; (4) renewable hydrocarbon fuels via biochemical conversion of herbaceous lignocellulosic biomass; (5) renewable diesel via HTL of a blend of algae and woody biomass; and (6) renewable diesel via combined algae processing (CAP). This technical report focuses on the environmental performance of these six biofuel production pathways in their 2018 SOT cases, as well as in their design cases (future target projections). The results of these renewable hydrocarbon fuel pathways in these SCSA analyses update those for the respective 2015 and 2016 SOT cases (Edward Frank et al. 2016; Hao Cai et al. 2016, 2017; Cai et al. 2018) in the case of IDL, algae CAP, and biochemical conversion pathways. They also provide an opportunity to examine the impact of technology improvements in both biomass feedstock production and biofuel production that have been achieved in 2018 SOTs on the sustainability performance of these renewable transportation fuels, and they reflect updates to Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model, which was released in October 2018 (Wang et al. 2018). These GREET updates include production of natural gas, electricity, and petroleum-based fuels that can influence biofuels’ supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) (CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions, water consumption and air pollutant emissions. GHG emissions, water consumption, and 2 nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions are the main sustainability metrics assessed in this analysis. In this analysis, we define water consumption as the amount of water withdrawn from a freshwater source that is not returned (or returnable) to a freshwater source at the same level of quality. Life-cycle fossil energy consumption and net energy balance, which is the life-cycle fossil energy consumption deducted from the renewable biofuel energy produced, are also assessed.},
doi = {10.2172/1499023},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

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