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Title: A Distributed Power System Control Architecture for Improved Distribution System Resiliency

Abstract

Here, electric distribution systems around the world are seeing an increasing number of utility-owned and non-utility-owned (customer-owned) intelligent devices and systems being deployed. New deployments of utility-owned assets include self-healing systems, microgrids, and distribution automation. Non-utility-owned assets include solar photovoltaic generation, behind-the-meter energy storage systems, and electric vehicles. While these deployments provide potential data and control points, existing centralized control architectures do not have the flexibility or the scalability to integrate the increasing number or variety of devices. The communication bandwidth, latency, and the scalability of a centralized control architecture limit the ability of these new devices and systems from being engaged as active resources. This paper presents a standards-based architecture for distributed power system controls that increases operational flexibility by coordinating centralized and distributed control systems. The system actively engages utility and non-utility assets using a distributed architecture to increase reliability during normal operations and resiliency during extreme events. Results from laboratory testing and preliminary field implementations, as well as details of an ongoing full-scale implementation at Duke Energy, are presented.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [6];  [6];  [7];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10] more »;  [10] « less
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Duke Energy, Charlotte, NC (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Boulder, CO (United States)
  5. Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  7. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  8. Smart Electric Power Alliance, Washington, D.C. (United States)
  9. General Electric Grid Solutions, Redmond, WA (United States)
  10. United States Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium; USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1497257
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1491864; OSTI ID: 1497258; OSTI ID: 1497988; OSTI ID: 1531257
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-139718; NREL/JA-5C00-73398
Journal ID: ISSN 2169-3536
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830; AC36-08GO28308; AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
IEEE Access
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-3536
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; distributed control; microgrids; power distribution; power system protection; smart grids

Citation Formats

Schneider, Kevin P., Laval, Stuart, Hansen, Jacob, Melton, Ron, Ponder, Leslie, Fox, Lance, Hart, John, Hambrick, Joshua, Buckner, Mark, Baggu, Murali, Prabakar, Kumaraguru, Manjrekar, Madhav, Essakiappan, Somasundaram, Tolbert, Leon, Liu, Yilu, Dong, Jiaojiao, Zhu, Lin, Smallwood, Aaron, Jayantilal, Avnaesh, Irwin, Chris, and Yuan, Guohui. A Distributed Power System Control Architecture for Improved Distribution System Resiliency. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2891368.
Schneider, Kevin P., Laval, Stuart, Hansen, Jacob, Melton, Ron, Ponder, Leslie, Fox, Lance, Hart, John, Hambrick, Joshua, Buckner, Mark, Baggu, Murali, Prabakar, Kumaraguru, Manjrekar, Madhav, Essakiappan, Somasundaram, Tolbert, Leon, Liu, Yilu, Dong, Jiaojiao, Zhu, Lin, Smallwood, Aaron, Jayantilal, Avnaesh, Irwin, Chris, & Yuan, Guohui. A Distributed Power System Control Architecture for Improved Distribution System Resiliency. United States. doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2891368.
Schneider, Kevin P., Laval, Stuart, Hansen, Jacob, Melton, Ron, Ponder, Leslie, Fox, Lance, Hart, John, Hambrick, Joshua, Buckner, Mark, Baggu, Murali, Prabakar, Kumaraguru, Manjrekar, Madhav, Essakiappan, Somasundaram, Tolbert, Leon, Liu, Yilu, Dong, Jiaojiao, Zhu, Lin, Smallwood, Aaron, Jayantilal, Avnaesh, Irwin, Chris, and Yuan, Guohui. Fri . "A Distributed Power System Control Architecture for Improved Distribution System Resiliency". United States. doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2891368.
@article{osti_1497257,
title = {A Distributed Power System Control Architecture for Improved Distribution System Resiliency},
author = {Schneider, Kevin P. and Laval, Stuart and Hansen, Jacob and Melton, Ron and Ponder, Leslie and Fox, Lance and Hart, John and Hambrick, Joshua and Buckner, Mark and Baggu, Murali and Prabakar, Kumaraguru and Manjrekar, Madhav and Essakiappan, Somasundaram and Tolbert, Leon and Liu, Yilu and Dong, Jiaojiao and Zhu, Lin and Smallwood, Aaron and Jayantilal, Avnaesh and Irwin, Chris and Yuan, Guohui},
abstractNote = {Here, electric distribution systems around the world are seeing an increasing number of utility-owned and non-utility-owned (customer-owned) intelligent devices and systems being deployed. New deployments of utility-owned assets include self-healing systems, microgrids, and distribution automation. Non-utility-owned assets include solar photovoltaic generation, behind-the-meter energy storage systems, and electric vehicles. While these deployments provide potential data and control points, existing centralized control architectures do not have the flexibility or the scalability to integrate the increasing number or variety of devices. The communication bandwidth, latency, and the scalability of a centralized control architecture limit the ability of these new devices and systems from being engaged as active resources. This paper presents a standards-based architecture for distributed power system controls that increases operational flexibility by coordinating centralized and distributed control systems. The system actively engages utility and non-utility assets using a distributed architecture to increase reliability during normal operations and resiliency during extreme events. Results from laboratory testing and preliminary field implementations, as well as details of an ongoing full-scale implementation at Duke Energy, are presented.},
doi = {10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2891368},
journal = {IEEE Access},
issn = {2169-3536},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2891368

Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Idealized primary, secondary, and tertiary frequency response and controls following the loss of a generating unit.

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Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.