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Title: Unveiling the unseen with the Dark Energy Survey: gravitational waves and dark matter

Abstract

In this thesis I show how large galaxy surveys, in particular the study of the properties of galaxies, can shed light on gravitational wave sources and dark matter. This is achieved using the latest data from the Dark Energy Survey, an on-going $$5000 ~{\rm deg}^2$$ optical survey. Galaxy properties such as photometric redshifts and stellar masses are derived through spectral energy distribution fitting methods. The results are used to study host galaxies of gravitational wave events and how light traces dark matter in galaxy clusters. Gravitational wave (GW) science, and particularly the electromagnetic follow up of these events, is transforming what had never been seen into a new astronomical field able to unveil the nature of cataclysmic events. Identifying the galaxies that host these events, and estimating their redshift, stellar mass, and star--formation rate, is crucial for cosmological analysis with gravitational waves, for follow up studies and to understand the format ion of the binary systems that are thought to produce observable gravitational wave signals. This thesis describes how host galaxies are important for the DES--GW pipeline used in identifying optical counterparts to GW events. In occasion of the exciting discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave event by our DES--GW team among others, we showed how observations of NGC 4993, the galaxy host of the event, provide important information about possible formation scenarios for binary neutron stars. In particular, we find that NGC 4993 presents shell structures and we relate their formation to the binary formation. The same galaxy properties are used to derive an observable mass proxy for galaxy clusters. I show that this mass observable correlates well with the total mass of clusters, which is mainly composed of dark matter. It can therefore be used for cosmological studies with galaxy clusters. The measurement of stellar--to--halo mass relations i n clusters provides insights on the connection between the s! tar content and the total matter content in clusters, and how this evolves over cosmic time.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University Coll. London
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1497090
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-THESIS-2018-27
1721707
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Palmese, Antonella. Unveiling the unseen with the Dark Energy Survey: gravitational waves and dark matter. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1497090.
Palmese, Antonella. Unveiling the unseen with the Dark Energy Survey: gravitational waves and dark matter. United States. doi:10.2172/1497090.
Palmese, Antonella. Mon . "Unveiling the unseen with the Dark Energy Survey: gravitational waves and dark matter". United States. doi:10.2172/1497090. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1497090.
@article{osti_1497090,
title = {Unveiling the unseen with the Dark Energy Survey: gravitational waves and dark matter},
author = {Palmese, Antonella},
abstractNote = {In this thesis I show how large galaxy surveys, in particular the study of the properties of galaxies, can shed light on gravitational wave sources and dark matter. This is achieved using the latest data from the Dark Energy Survey, an on-going $5000 ~{\rm deg}^2$ optical survey. Galaxy properties such as photometric redshifts and stellar masses are derived through spectral energy distribution fitting methods. The results are used to study host galaxies of gravitational wave events and how light traces dark matter in galaxy clusters. Gravitational wave (GW) science, and particularly the electromagnetic follow up of these events, is transforming what had never been seen into a new astronomical field able to unveil the nature of cataclysmic events. Identifying the galaxies that host these events, and estimating their redshift, stellar mass, and star--formation rate, is crucial for cosmological analysis with gravitational waves, for follow up studies and to understand the format ion of the binary systems that are thought to produce observable gravitational wave signals. This thesis describes how host galaxies are important for the DES--GW pipeline used in identifying optical counterparts to GW events. In occasion of the exciting discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave event by our DES--GW team among others, we showed how observations of NGC 4993, the galaxy host of the event, provide important information about possible formation scenarios for binary neutron stars. In particular, we find that NGC 4993 presents shell structures and we relate their formation to the binary formation. The same galaxy properties are used to derive an observable mass proxy for galaxy clusters. I show that this mass observable correlates well with the total mass of clusters, which is mainly composed of dark matter. It can therefore be used for cosmological studies with galaxy clusters. The measurement of stellar--to--halo mass relations i n clusters provides insights on the connection between the s! tar content and the total matter content in clusters, and how this evolves over cosmic time.},
doi = {10.2172/1497090},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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