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Title: Determining the Drivers of Redox Sensitive Biogeochemistry in Humid Tropical Forests

Abstract

Our objectives were to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics and drivers of soil O2 availability and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes using easily measured and modeled parameters. We used automated soil O2 sensing coupled with measurements of soil chemical and physical properties, climate, and greenhouse gas concentrations and fluxes. These results are being used to derive quantitative relationships linking climate and soil physical properties to redox sensitive biogeochemical processes in tropical forests. We tested the hypothesis that hot spots and hot moments are driven primarily by high substrate availability using distributed sampling and field and lab fertilization experiments. To better model C and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes in Earth system models we need to develop a more mechanistic understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics and drivers of soil O2 availability in tropical forest soils. In this study we used field and laboratory experiments to help develop a mechanistically derived redox component for the Community Land Model (CLM) module of the Community Earth System Model (CESM).

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. UC Berkeley
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
University Of California, Berkeley
OSTI Identifier:
1497083
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCB-DE-FOA-0000749
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010567
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Gross, A., Lin, Y., Pett-Ridge, J., Weber, P. K., Silver, W. L. Redox conditions control microbial phosphorus uptake in humid tropical forests. Ecology, in review. O’Connell, C. S. and Silver, W. L. Hot spots and hot moments: Investigating the relationship between soil redox dynamics and greenhouse gas fluxes in a wet tropical forest. For submission to Global Change Biology. Yamamoto, K.*, O’Connell, C. S., Silver, W. L. “The effects of topography on leaf litter decomposition in a humid tropical forest ecosystem.” For submissions to Ecosystems *Undergraduate Honors Thesis advisee, UC Berkeley Lin, Y., Gross, A. and Silver, W. L. Anoxic conditions maintained high phosphorus sorption in humid tropical forest soils. In review, Biogeosciences. Lin, Y., Gross, A. and Silver, W. L. Rainfall effects on phosphorus fractions in wet tropical forest soils. For submission to JGR-Biogeosciences.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; Redox, greenhouse gases, tropical forest, carbon, models

Citation Formats

Silver, Whendee. Determining the Drivers of Redox Sensitive Biogeochemistry in Humid Tropical Forests. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1497083.
Silver, Whendee. Determining the Drivers of Redox Sensitive Biogeochemistry in Humid Tropical Forests. United States. doi:10.2172/1497083.
Silver, Whendee. Fri . "Determining the Drivers of Redox Sensitive Biogeochemistry in Humid Tropical Forests". United States. doi:10.2172/1497083. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1497083.
@article{osti_1497083,
title = {Determining the Drivers of Redox Sensitive Biogeochemistry in Humid Tropical Forests},
author = {Silver, Whendee},
abstractNote = {Our objectives were to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics and drivers of soil O2 availability and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes using easily measured and modeled parameters. We used automated soil O2 sensing coupled with measurements of soil chemical and physical properties, climate, and greenhouse gas concentrations and fluxes. These results are being used to derive quantitative relationships linking climate and soil physical properties to redox sensitive biogeochemical processes in tropical forests. We tested the hypothesis that hot spots and hot moments are driven primarily by high substrate availability using distributed sampling and field and lab fertilization experiments. To better model C and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes in Earth system models we need to develop a more mechanistic understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics and drivers of soil O2 availability in tropical forest soils. In this study we used field and laboratory experiments to help develop a mechanistically derived redox component for the Community Land Model (CLM) module of the Community Earth System Model (CESM).},
doi = {10.2172/1497083},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}