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Title: Natural and Engineered Features Supporting Environmental Performance of Idaho National Laboratory’s Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

Abstract

The Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH LLW) Disposal Facility has been designed and constructed to receive waste generated at the INL site in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Naval Reactors (NR) missions. The facility has been designed to receive legacy RH LLW currently in storage at INL facilities and new waste generated by nuclear research programs. RH LLW to be received at the facility is solid waste consisting of surface contaminated debris; ion exchange resins used to purify cooling and canal water; activated metals generated during reactor core change outs and Naval spent fuel management; and nuclear Research & Development. Disposal of INL's RH LLW poses unique disposal challenges due to high radiation levels (contact rates up to 600 Sv/hr [60,000 Rem/hr]) that require remote handling and adequate shielding for transportation and disposal. The facility has been designed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 [1], including the all-pathways dose, air pathway dose, inadvertent intruder doses, and radon emissions limits. This paper presents an overview of natural and engineered design features that support the safety case and enhance the environmental performance of the facility. These include locationmore » selection, use of reinforced pre-cast concrete vaults; a robust hydraulic drainage system; use of steel waste canisters for waste disposal; the facility monitoring system; facility layout; and crediting waste forms. The facility performance assessment (PA) [2] developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 “Radioactive Waste Management” credits each of these protective features. Releases from waste forms disposed of at this facility are limited by corrosion of the steel waste canisters which will ultimately allow contact with infiltrating water followed by transport of radionuclides from the vault system. The steel waste canisters were credited for their ability to limit water contact with the waste based on the demonstrated ability of the reinforced pre-caste concrete vaults to provide long-term structural protection of the steel waste canisters. Verification of hydraulic and concrete performance was conducted through laboratory data, field infiltration tests supported by a robust monitoring system, and numerical modeling. Releases into the vault system from activated metals are based on site-specific corrosion data. Radionuclide transport from the vault system from all waste forms is based on site-specific climatological, hydrologic, and stratigraphic data. At INL, the groundwater pathway historically and appropriately has received the most attention. By crediting aspects of the natural system, the engineered vault system, and the waste, estimated radiologic doses via the groundwater pathway are minimal. Air pathway doses were reduced by differentially crediting corrosion of aluminum and stainless steel activated metals resulting in the pathway being screened out of the PA. Groundwater and inadvertent intruder doses were reduced through selective facility layout. This paper provides an overview of the system-wide protective features incorporated into the facility design along with an extensive reference list to supporting technical papers and analyses that provide data and interpretation.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
  2. Idaho National Laboratory (retired)
  3. KSpar-Inc
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1497057
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-18-52173-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2019 Waste Management Symposium, Phoenix, AZ, 03/03/2019 - 03/07/2019
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 - MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; Radioactive Waste; Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste; Performance Assessment

Citation Formats

Sondrup, A Jeffrey, Orchard, Brady J, Welty, Brett D, Schafer, Annette L., and Rood, Arthur S. Natural and Engineered Features Supporting Environmental Performance of Idaho National Laboratory’s Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Sondrup, A Jeffrey, Orchard, Brady J, Welty, Brett D, Schafer, Annette L., & Rood, Arthur S. Natural and Engineered Features Supporting Environmental Performance of Idaho National Laboratory’s Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. United States.
Sondrup, A Jeffrey, Orchard, Brady J, Welty, Brett D, Schafer, Annette L., and Rood, Arthur S. Mon . "Natural and Engineered Features Supporting Environmental Performance of Idaho National Laboratory’s Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1497057.
@article{osti_1497057,
title = {Natural and Engineered Features Supporting Environmental Performance of Idaho National Laboratory’s Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility},
author = {Sondrup, A Jeffrey and Orchard, Brady J and Welty, Brett D and Schafer, Annette L. and Rood, Arthur S.},
abstractNote = {The Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH LLW) Disposal Facility has been designed and constructed to receive waste generated at the INL site in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Naval Reactors (NR) missions. The facility has been designed to receive legacy RH LLW currently in storage at INL facilities and new waste generated by nuclear research programs. RH LLW to be received at the facility is solid waste consisting of surface contaminated debris; ion exchange resins used to purify cooling and canal water; activated metals generated during reactor core change outs and Naval spent fuel management; and nuclear Research & Development. Disposal of INL's RH LLW poses unique disposal challenges due to high radiation levels (contact rates up to 600 Sv/hr [60,000 Rem/hr]) that require remote handling and adequate shielding for transportation and disposal. The facility has been designed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 [1], including the all-pathways dose, air pathway dose, inadvertent intruder doses, and radon emissions limits. This paper presents an overview of natural and engineered design features that support the safety case and enhance the environmental performance of the facility. These include location selection, use of reinforced pre-cast concrete vaults; a robust hydraulic drainage system; use of steel waste canisters for waste disposal; the facility monitoring system; facility layout; and crediting waste forms. The facility performance assessment (PA) [2] developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 “Radioactive Waste Management” credits each of these protective features. Releases from waste forms disposed of at this facility are limited by corrosion of the steel waste canisters which will ultimately allow contact with infiltrating water followed by transport of radionuclides from the vault system. The steel waste canisters were credited for their ability to limit water contact with the waste based on the demonstrated ability of the reinforced pre-caste concrete vaults to provide long-term structural protection of the steel waste canisters. Verification of hydraulic and concrete performance was conducted through laboratory data, field infiltration tests supported by a robust monitoring system, and numerical modeling. Releases into the vault system from activated metals are based on site-specific corrosion data. Radionuclide transport from the vault system from all waste forms is based on site-specific climatological, hydrologic, and stratigraphic data. At INL, the groundwater pathway historically and appropriately has received the most attention. By crediting aspects of the natural system, the engineered vault system, and the waste, estimated radiologic doses via the groundwater pathway are minimal. Air pathway doses were reduced by differentially crediting corrosion of aluminum and stainless steel activated metals resulting in the pathway being screened out of the PA. Groundwater and inadvertent intruder doses were reduced through selective facility layout. This paper provides an overview of the system-wide protective features incorporated into the facility design along with an extensive reference list to supporting technical papers and analyses that provide data and interpretation.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1497057}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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