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Title: Describing the users: Understanding adoption of and interest in shared, electrified, and automated transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area

Abstract

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Emerging technologies and services stand poised to transform the transportation system, with large implications for energy use and mobility. The degree and speed of these impacts depend largely on who adopts these innovations and how quickly. Leveraging data from a novel survey of San Francisco Bay Area residents, we analyze adoption patterns for shared mobility, electrified vehicle technologies, and vehicle automation. We find that ride-hailing and adaptive cruise control have penetrated the market more extensively than have electrified vehicles or car-sharing services. Over half of respondents have adopted or expressed interest in adopting all levels of vehicle automation. Overall, there is substantial potential for market growth for the technologies and services we analyzed. Using county fixed effects regressions, we investigate which individual and location-level factors correlate to adoption and interest. We find that, although higher-income people are disproportionately represented among current adopters of most new technologies and services, low- to middle-income people are just as likely to have adopted pooled ride-hailing. Younger generations have high interest in automated and electrified vehicles relative to their current adoption of these technologies, suggesting that young people could contribute substantially to future market growth—as they are doing for ride-hailing. Wemore » find no evidence that longer commutes present a barrier to plug-in electric vehicle adoption. Finally, women are less likely than men to adopt and/or be interested in adopting most new transportation technologies, with the exception of ride-hailing; designing or marketing technologies with women's preferences in mind could contribute to future market expansion.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  3. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  4. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1496844
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1547807; OSTI ID: 1605691
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5400-73340
Journal ID: ISSN 1361-9209
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Transportation Research. Part D, Transport and Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 71; Journal ID: ISSN 1361-9209
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; transportation decisions; technology adoption; ride-hailing; automated vehicles; car-sharing; electric vehicles

Citation Formats

Spurlock, C. Anna, Sears, James, Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle, Walker, Victor, Jin, Ling, Taylor, Margaret, Duvall, Andrew, Gopal, Anand, and Todd, Annika. Describing the users: Understanding adoption of and interest in shared, electrified, and automated transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.trd.2019.01.014.
Spurlock, C. Anna, Sears, James, Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle, Walker, Victor, Jin, Ling, Taylor, Margaret, Duvall, Andrew, Gopal, Anand, & Todd, Annika. Describing the users: Understanding adoption of and interest in shared, electrified, and automated transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trd.2019.01.014
Spurlock, C. Anna, Sears, James, Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle, Walker, Victor, Jin, Ling, Taylor, Margaret, Duvall, Andrew, Gopal, Anand, and Todd, Annika. Thu . "Describing the users: Understanding adoption of and interest in shared, electrified, and automated transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trd.2019.01.014. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1496844.
@article{osti_1496844,
title = {Describing the users: Understanding adoption of and interest in shared, electrified, and automated transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area},
author = {Spurlock, C. Anna and Sears, James and Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle and Walker, Victor and Jin, Ling and Taylor, Margaret and Duvall, Andrew and Gopal, Anand and Todd, Annika},
abstractNote = {© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Emerging technologies and services stand poised to transform the transportation system, with large implications for energy use and mobility. The degree and speed of these impacts depend largely on who adopts these innovations and how quickly. Leveraging data from a novel survey of San Francisco Bay Area residents, we analyze adoption patterns for shared mobility, electrified vehicle technologies, and vehicle automation. We find that ride-hailing and adaptive cruise control have penetrated the market more extensively than have electrified vehicles or car-sharing services. Over half of respondents have adopted or expressed interest in adopting all levels of vehicle automation. Overall, there is substantial potential for market growth for the technologies and services we analyzed. Using county fixed effects regressions, we investigate which individual and location-level factors correlate to adoption and interest. We find that, although higher-income people are disproportionately represented among current adopters of most new technologies and services, low- to middle-income people are just as likely to have adopted pooled ride-hailing. Younger generations have high interest in automated and electrified vehicles relative to their current adoption of these technologies, suggesting that young people could contribute substantially to future market growth—as they are doing for ride-hailing. We find no evidence that longer commutes present a barrier to plug-in electric vehicle adoption. Finally, women are less likely than men to adopt and/or be interested in adopting most new transportation technologies, with the exception of ride-hailing; designing or marketing technologies with women's preferences in mind could contribute to future market expansion.},
doi = {10.1016/j.trd.2019.01.014},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1496844}, journal = {Transportation Research. Part D, Transport and Environment},
issn = {1361-9209},
number = ,
volume = 71,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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