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Title: Solidified Organics Testing

Abstract

The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center currently has plutonium-containing liquid organic waste that must be solidified before final disposal as solid debris waste. The documented safety analysis for the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center limits the amount of plutonium that can be released from solid debris waste forms during a fire scenario, which is less than 10 −4 airborne release fraction. Experimental results for plutonium release fractions from burning various materials has been compiled by the Department of Energy [DOE, 1994]. Combustion of organic liquids gave an average airborne release fraction of 6 × 10 −3 and combustion of surface-contaminated solids (paper, plastic, etc.) gave an average airborne release fraction of 5 × 10 −4. Burning of 30% tri- n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene gave cerium release fractions of 5.6–7.7 × 10 −3[Mishima and Schwendiman, 1973]. Earlier testing had evaluated many different grout-based formulations to solidify plutonium-containing organic waste liquids, and the ones used in these tests were shown to produce monolithic, fairly homogeneous solids. Each of the waste forms tested would meet the waste acceptance criteria for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as transuranic waste, but there were questions about whether they would meet the plutonium release criteria duringmore » a fire. The purpose of the work described here was to quantify the airborne release fraction for cerium, as a surrogate for plutonium, in these proposed waste forms. Cerium is often used as a simulant for plutonium in bench-scale testing, and cerium nitrate hexahydrate [Ce (NO 3) 3·6H 2O] was added to the organic solutions that were solidified to prepare the surrogate waste forms for these tests. The waste forms were subjected to the designated fire scenario of 600ºC for 1 hour, and any cerium in the off-gas was trapped using a quartz filter followed by a scrubber containing 0.1 M NaOH, which is the same as used by Mishima and Schwendiman, [1973].« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1495966
Report Number(s):
ORNL/LTR-2018/1037
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Taylor, Paul Allen, Mattus, Catherine H., and Walker, Trenton Baird. Solidified Organics Testing. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1495966.
Taylor, Paul Allen, Mattus, Catherine H., & Walker, Trenton Baird. Solidified Organics Testing. United States. doi:10.2172/1495966.
Taylor, Paul Allen, Mattus, Catherine H., and Walker, Trenton Baird. Thu . "Solidified Organics Testing". United States. doi:10.2172/1495966. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1495966.
@article{osti_1495966,
title = {Solidified Organics Testing},
author = {Taylor, Paul Allen and Mattus, Catherine H. and Walker, Trenton Baird},
abstractNote = {The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center currently has plutonium-containing liquid organic waste that must be solidified before final disposal as solid debris waste. The documented safety analysis for the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center limits the amount of plutonium that can be released from solid debris waste forms during a fire scenario, which is less than 10−4 airborne release fraction. Experimental results for plutonium release fractions from burning various materials has been compiled by the Department of Energy [DOE, 1994]. Combustion of organic liquids gave an average airborne release fraction of 6 × 10−3 and combustion of surface-contaminated solids (paper, plastic, etc.) gave an average airborne release fraction of 5 × 10−4. Burning of 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene gave cerium release fractions of 5.6–7.7 × 10−3[Mishima and Schwendiman, 1973]. Earlier testing had evaluated many different grout-based formulations to solidify plutonium-containing organic waste liquids, and the ones used in these tests were shown to produce monolithic, fairly homogeneous solids. Each of the waste forms tested would meet the waste acceptance criteria for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as transuranic waste, but there were questions about whether they would meet the plutonium release criteria during a fire. The purpose of the work described here was to quantify the airborne release fraction for cerium, as a surrogate for plutonium, in these proposed waste forms. Cerium is often used as a simulant for plutonium in bench-scale testing, and cerium nitrate hexahydrate [Ce (NO3)3·6H2O] was added to the organic solutions that were solidified to prepare the surrogate waste forms for these tests. The waste forms were subjected to the designated fire scenario of 600ºC for 1 hour, and any cerium in the off-gas was trapped using a quartz filter followed by a scrubber containing 0.1 M NaOH, which is the same as used by Mishima and Schwendiman, [1973].},
doi = {10.2172/1495966},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

Technical Report:

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