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Title: Plant-microbe interactions before drought influence plant physiological responses to subsequent severe drought

Abstract

We examined the effect of soil microbial communities on plant physiological responses to drought. Bouteloua gracilis seeds were planted in sterilized sand with (inoculated) and without (controls) soil microbial communities. After substantial growth, drought was imposed by completely withholding water. Before soil moisture declined to zero, inoculated plants germinated faster, were significantly taller, and maintained greater soil moisture than controls. The greater soil moisture of the inoculated plants allowed greater photosynthesis but also induced lower tissue drought tolerance (as indicated by turgor loss point) compared to controls. The inoculated plants were more susceptible to severe drought compared to control plants as indicated by significantly lower mean stomatal conductance, as well as marginally significantly greater mean wilting score, for the entire severe drought period after soil moisture declined to zero. Inoculated plants exhibited enhanced growth and photosynthesis and dampened drought stress over short timescales, but also increased susceptibility to drought over long timescales. Furthermore this work demonstrates (1) an unexpected insight that microbes can have positive initial effects on plant performance, but negative impacts on plant performance during severe drought, and (2) that microbially altered effects on plant function during well-watered and moderate drought conditions can influence plant function under subsequentmore » severe drought.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1495170
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-31425
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biological Science

Citation Formats

Ulrich, Danielle E. M., Sevanto, Sanna Annika, Ryan, Max Gabriel, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Johansen, Renee B., and Dunbar, John Martin. Plant-microbe interactions before drought influence plant physiological responses to subsequent severe drought. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36971-3.
Ulrich, Danielle E. M., Sevanto, Sanna Annika, Ryan, Max Gabriel, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Johansen, Renee B., & Dunbar, John Martin. Plant-microbe interactions before drought influence plant physiological responses to subsequent severe drought. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36971-3.
Ulrich, Danielle E. M., Sevanto, Sanna Annika, Ryan, Max Gabriel, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Johansen, Renee B., and Dunbar, John Martin. Tue . "Plant-microbe interactions before drought influence plant physiological responses to subsequent severe drought". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36971-3. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1495170.
@article{osti_1495170,
title = {Plant-microbe interactions before drought influence plant physiological responses to subsequent severe drought},
author = {Ulrich, Danielle E. M. and Sevanto, Sanna Annika and Ryan, Max Gabriel and Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson and Johansen, Renee B. and Dunbar, John Martin},
abstractNote = {We examined the effect of soil microbial communities on plant physiological responses to drought. Bouteloua gracilis seeds were planted in sterilized sand with (inoculated) and without (controls) soil microbial communities. After substantial growth, drought was imposed by completely withholding water. Before soil moisture declined to zero, inoculated plants germinated faster, were significantly taller, and maintained greater soil moisture than controls. The greater soil moisture of the inoculated plants allowed greater photosynthesis but also induced lower tissue drought tolerance (as indicated by turgor loss point) compared to controls. The inoculated plants were more susceptible to severe drought compared to control plants as indicated by significantly lower mean stomatal conductance, as well as marginally significantly greater mean wilting score, for the entire severe drought period after soil moisture declined to zero. Inoculated plants exhibited enhanced growth and photosynthesis and dampened drought stress over short timescales, but also increased susceptibility to drought over long timescales. Furthermore this work demonstrates (1) an unexpected insight that microbes can have positive initial effects on plant performance, but negative impacts on plant performance during severe drought, and (2) that microbially altered effects on plant function during well-watered and moderate drought conditions can influence plant function under subsequent severe drought.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-36971-3},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
issn = {2045-2322},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Number of individual plants that germinated for control and inoculated groups. Asterisks indicate significant differences between control and inoculated groups at P ≤ 0.05. All values are expressed as means ±SE. The green background color indicates the germination period during the well-watered period.

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Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.