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Title: Elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum single crystals shocked to 12.5 GPa: Crystal anisotropy effects

Abstract

Here, to understand crystal anisotropy effects on shock-induced elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum (Mo), results from high-purity single crystals shocked along [110] and [111] orientations to an elastic impact stress of 12.5 GPa were obtained and compared with the [100] results previously reported [A. Mandal and Y. M Gupta, J. Appl. Phys. 121, 045903 (2017)]. Measured wave profiles showed a time-dependent response, and strong anisotropy was observed in the elastic wave attenuation with the propagation distance, elastic limits, shock speeds, and overall structure of the wave profiles. Resolved shear stresses on {110} $$\langle$$111$$\rangle$$ and {112} $$\langle$$111$$\rangle$$ slip systems provided insight into the observed anisotropy in elastic wave attenuation and elastic limits and showed that shear stresses, and not longitudinal stresses, are a better measure of strength in shocked single crystals. Under shock compression, resolved shear stresses at elastic limits were comparable to the Peierls stress of screw dislocations in Mo. Elastic wave attenuation was rapid when shear stresses were larger than the Peierls stress. Large differences in the elastic limits under shock and quasi-static loading are likely a consequence of the large Peierls stress value for Mo. Numerically simulated wave profiles, obtained using the dislocation-based plasticity model described in the [100] work, showed good agreement with all measured wave profiles but could not differentiate between the {110} $$\langle$$111$$\rangle$$ and {112} $$\langle$$111$$\rangle$$ slip systems. Overall, experimental results and corresponding numerical simulations for the three crystal orientations have provided a comprehensive insight into shock-induced elastic-plastic deformation of Mo single crystals, including the development of a continuum material model.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA
  2. Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. for Shock Physics; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Programs (DP) (NA-10)
OSTI Identifier:
1495157
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1493763
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-28318
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002007; 89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 125; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; molybdenum; single crystal; plastic deformation; shock wave; crystal plasticity; dislocation slip; wave profile simulation; BCC; body-centered cubic

Citation Formats

Mandal, A., and Gupta, Y. M. Elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum single crystals shocked to 12.5 GPa: Crystal anisotropy effects. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5048131.
Mandal, A., & Gupta, Y. M. Elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum single crystals shocked to 12.5 GPa: Crystal anisotropy effects. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5048131.
Mandal, A., and Gupta, Y. M. Thu . "Elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum single crystals shocked to 12.5 GPa: Crystal anisotropy effects". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5048131.
@article{osti_1495157,
title = {Elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum single crystals shocked to 12.5 GPa: Crystal anisotropy effects},
author = {Mandal, A. and Gupta, Y. M.},
abstractNote = {Here, to understand crystal anisotropy effects on shock-induced elastic-plastic deformation of molybdenum (Mo), results from high-purity single crystals shocked along [110] and [111] orientations to an elastic impact stress of 12.5 GPa were obtained and compared with the [100] results previously reported [A. Mandal and Y. M Gupta, J. Appl. Phys. 121, 045903 (2017)]. Measured wave profiles showed a time-dependent response, and strong anisotropy was observed in the elastic wave attenuation with the propagation distance, elastic limits, shock speeds, and overall structure of the wave profiles. Resolved shear stresses on {110} $\langle$111$\rangle$ and {112} $\langle$111$\rangle$ slip systems provided insight into the observed anisotropy in elastic wave attenuation and elastic limits and showed that shear stresses, and not longitudinal stresses, are a better measure of strength in shocked single crystals. Under shock compression, resolved shear stresses at elastic limits were comparable to the Peierls stress of screw dislocations in Mo. Elastic wave attenuation was rapid when shear stresses were larger than the Peierls stress. Large differences in the elastic limits under shock and quasi-static loading are likely a consequence of the large Peierls stress value for Mo. Numerically simulated wave profiles, obtained using the dislocation-based plasticity model described in the [100] work, showed good agreement with all measured wave profiles but could not differentiate between the {110} $\langle$111$\rangle$ and {112} $\langle$111$\rangle$ slip systems. Overall, experimental results and corresponding numerical simulations for the three crystal orientations have provided a comprehensive insight into shock-induced elastic-plastic deformation of Mo single crystals, including the development of a continuum material model.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5048131},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 5,
volume = 125,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
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