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Title: Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22

Abstract

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is concerned with the corrosion resistance of candidate engineered waste package materials. A variety of waste package designs have been proposed for US and Canadian High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A common feature of each design is the possibility of utilizing a corrosion resistant material such as a nickel-based super alloy or titanium-based alloy. A suitable corrosion resistant material may provide (a) kinetic immunity if the combination of repository environmental conditions and alloy resistance assure both: (i) a passive condition with negligible chance of localized corrosion stabilization, as well as (ii) low enough passive dissolution rates to insure conventional corrosion allowance over geological times, (b) a second form of ''corrosion allowance,'' if it can be scientifically demonstrated that a mechanism for stifling (i.e., death) of localized corrosion propagation occurs well before waste canisters are penetrated, or (c) such a low probability of initiation and continued propagation that a tolerably low degree of penetration occurs. Unfortunately, a large database on the crevice corrosion properties of alloy 22 does not exist in comparison to alloy 625. Alloy screening tests in oxidizing acids containing FeCl3 indicate that alloy 22 is more resistant to crevice corrosion than 625more » as indicated by critical pit and crevice temperatures. Differences in alloying element compositions as expressed by pitting resistance equivalency number calculations support these findings. However, these data only provide the relative ranking of these alloys in terms of crevice corrosion and do not answer the critical questions proposed above.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
14948
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-135852
TRN: US0106860
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 196th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society Inc., 1999 Fall Meeting of the Electrochemical Society of Japan, Honolulu, HI (US), 10/17/1999--10/22/1999; Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; HASTELLOYS; INCONEL 625; CORROSION RESISTANCE; CREVICE CORROSION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; CONTAINERS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; MATERIALS TESTING

Citation Formats

Palmer, J, Kehler, B, Iloybare, G O, and Scully, J R. Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Palmer, J, Kehler, B, Iloybare, G O, & Scully, J R. Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22. United States.
Palmer, J, Kehler, B, Iloybare, G O, and Scully, J R. Wed . "Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/14948.
@article{osti_14948,
title = {Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22},
author = {Palmer, J and Kehler, B and Iloybare, G O and Scully, J R},
abstractNote = {The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is concerned with the corrosion resistance of candidate engineered waste package materials. A variety of waste package designs have been proposed for US and Canadian High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A common feature of each design is the possibility of utilizing a corrosion resistant material such as a nickel-based super alloy or titanium-based alloy. A suitable corrosion resistant material may provide (a) kinetic immunity if the combination of repository environmental conditions and alloy resistance assure both: (i) a passive condition with negligible chance of localized corrosion stabilization, as well as (ii) low enough passive dissolution rates to insure conventional corrosion allowance over geological times, (b) a second form of ''corrosion allowance,'' if it can be scientifically demonstrated that a mechanism for stifling (i.e., death) of localized corrosion propagation occurs well before waste canisters are penetrated, or (c) such a low probability of initiation and continued propagation that a tolerably low degree of penetration occurs. Unfortunately, a large database on the crevice corrosion properties of alloy 22 does not exist in comparison to alloy 625. Alloy screening tests in oxidizing acids containing FeCl3 indicate that alloy 22 is more resistant to crevice corrosion than 625 as indicated by critical pit and crevice temperatures. Differences in alloying element compositions as expressed by pitting resistance equivalency number calculations support these findings. However, these data only provide the relative ranking of these alloys in terms of crevice corrosion and do not answer the critical questions proposed above.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}

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