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Title: Neutron scattering in the biological sciences: progress and prospects

Abstract

The scattering of neutrons can be used to provide information on the structure and dynamics of biological systems on multiple length and time scales. Pursuant to a National Science Foundation-funded workshop in February 2018, recent developments in this field are reviewed here, as well as future prospects that can be expected given recent advances in sources, instrumentation and computational power and methods. Crystallography, solution scattering, dynamics, membranes, labeling and imaging are examined. For the extraction of maximum information, the incorporation of judicious specific deuterium labeling, the integration of several types of experiment, and interpretation using high-performance computer simulation models are often found to be particularly powerful.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7];  [8];  [9]; ORCiD logo [10];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12];  [13];  [2];  [14];  [15]; ORCiD logo [16];  [17];  [18];  [19] more »;  [20];  [8]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [21];  [8];  [22];  [23]; ORCiD logo [8];  [17];  [24]; ORCiD logo [25];  [26];  [27];  [17]; ORCiD logo [2];  [28]; ORCiD logo [29]; ORCiD logo [30]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [31];  [8]; ORCiD logo [2];  [32];  [33]; ORCiD logo [34] « less
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). The Niels Bohr Inst.
  4. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineeering
  5. City College of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  6. Ohio State Univ. College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
  7. Graduate School of China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing (China)
  8. National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Neutron Research
  9. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  10. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  11. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Biomolecular Structure and Organization
  12. Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France); Unive. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France)
  13. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Perelman School of Medicine, Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  14. National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Neutron Research; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  15. Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Inst. of Natural Sciences
  16. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Scattering Science Division; National Research Council, ON (Canada). Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
  17. Univ. of Maryland, Rockville, MD (United States); National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Inst. for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
  18. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  19. Univ. d'Orleans, Orleans (France)
  20. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biology and Soft Matter Division
  21. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  22. Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  23. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics
  24. Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
  25. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
  26. Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom). Leicester Inst. of Structural and Chemical Biology, Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology
  27. Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering
  28. Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)
  29. Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France)
  30. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). UT/ORNL Center for Molecular Biophysics, Biosciences Division
  31. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Neutron Science, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  32. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  33. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology
  34. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1493122
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Acta Crystallographica. Section D. Structural Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 2059-7983
Publisher:
IUCr
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; neutron scattering; biological systems; structure and dynamics

Citation Formats

Ashkar, Rana, Bilheux, Hassina Z., Bordallo, Heliosa, Briber, Robert, Callaway, David J. E., Cheng, Xiaolin, Chu, Xiang-Qiang, Curtis, Joseph E., Dadmun, Mark, Fenimore, Paul, Fushman, David, Gabel, Frank, Gupta, Kushol, Herberle, Frederick, Heinrich, Frank, Hong, Liang, Katsaras, John, Kelman, Zvi, Kharlampieva, Eugenia, Kneller, Gerald R., Kovalevsky, Andrey, Krueger, Susan, Langan, Paul, Lieberman, Raquel, Liu, Yun, Losche, Mathias, Lyman, Edward, Mao, Yimin, Marino, John, Mattos, Carla, Meilleur, Flora, Moody, Peter, Nickels, Jonathan D., O'Dell, William B., O'Neill, Hugh, Perez-Salas, Ursula, Peters, Judith, Petridis, Loukas, Sokolov, Alexei P., Stanley, Christopher, Wagner, Norman, Weinrich, Michael, Weiss, Kevin L., Wymore, Troy, Zhang, Yang, and Smith, Jeremy C. Neutron scattering in the biological sciences: progress and prospects. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1107/S2059798318017503.
Ashkar, Rana, Bilheux, Hassina Z., Bordallo, Heliosa, Briber, Robert, Callaway, David J. E., Cheng, Xiaolin, Chu, Xiang-Qiang, Curtis, Joseph E., Dadmun, Mark, Fenimore, Paul, Fushman, David, Gabel, Frank, Gupta, Kushol, Herberle, Frederick, Heinrich, Frank, Hong, Liang, Katsaras, John, Kelman, Zvi, Kharlampieva, Eugenia, Kneller, Gerald R., Kovalevsky, Andrey, Krueger, Susan, Langan, Paul, Lieberman, Raquel, Liu, Yun, Losche, Mathias, Lyman, Edward, Mao, Yimin, Marino, John, Mattos, Carla, Meilleur, Flora, Moody, Peter, Nickels, Jonathan D., O'Dell, William B., O'Neill, Hugh, Perez-Salas, Ursula, Peters, Judith, Petridis, Loukas, Sokolov, Alexei P., Stanley, Christopher, Wagner, Norman, Weinrich, Michael, Weiss, Kevin L., Wymore, Troy, Zhang, Yang, & Smith, Jeremy C. Neutron scattering in the biological sciences: progress and prospects. United States. doi:10.1107/S2059798318017503.
Ashkar, Rana, Bilheux, Hassina Z., Bordallo, Heliosa, Briber, Robert, Callaway, David J. E., Cheng, Xiaolin, Chu, Xiang-Qiang, Curtis, Joseph E., Dadmun, Mark, Fenimore, Paul, Fushman, David, Gabel, Frank, Gupta, Kushol, Herberle, Frederick, Heinrich, Frank, Hong, Liang, Katsaras, John, Kelman, Zvi, Kharlampieva, Eugenia, Kneller, Gerald R., Kovalevsky, Andrey, Krueger, Susan, Langan, Paul, Lieberman, Raquel, Liu, Yun, Losche, Mathias, Lyman, Edward, Mao, Yimin, Marino, John, Mattos, Carla, Meilleur, Flora, Moody, Peter, Nickels, Jonathan D., O'Dell, William B., O'Neill, Hugh, Perez-Salas, Ursula, Peters, Judith, Petridis, Loukas, Sokolov, Alexei P., Stanley, Christopher, Wagner, Norman, Weinrich, Michael, Weiss, Kevin L., Wymore, Troy, Zhang, Yang, and Smith, Jeremy C. Sat . "Neutron scattering in the biological sciences: progress and prospects". United States. doi:10.1107/S2059798318017503.
@article{osti_1493122,
title = {Neutron scattering in the biological sciences: progress and prospects},
author = {Ashkar, Rana and Bilheux, Hassina Z. and Bordallo, Heliosa and Briber, Robert and Callaway, David J. E. and Cheng, Xiaolin and Chu, Xiang-Qiang and Curtis, Joseph E. and Dadmun, Mark and Fenimore, Paul and Fushman, David and Gabel, Frank and Gupta, Kushol and Herberle, Frederick and Heinrich, Frank and Hong, Liang and Katsaras, John and Kelman, Zvi and Kharlampieva, Eugenia and Kneller, Gerald R. and Kovalevsky, Andrey and Krueger, Susan and Langan, Paul and Lieberman, Raquel and Liu, Yun and Losche, Mathias and Lyman, Edward and Mao, Yimin and Marino, John and Mattos, Carla and Meilleur, Flora and Moody, Peter and Nickels, Jonathan D. and O'Dell, William B. and O'Neill, Hugh and Perez-Salas, Ursula and Peters, Judith and Petridis, Loukas and Sokolov, Alexei P. and Stanley, Christopher and Wagner, Norman and Weinrich, Michael and Weiss, Kevin L. and Wymore, Troy and Zhang, Yang and Smith, Jeremy C.},
abstractNote = {The scattering of neutrons can be used to provide information on the structure and dynamics of biological systems on multiple length and time scales. Pursuant to a National Science Foundation-funded workshop in February 2018, recent developments in this field are reviewed here, as well as future prospects that can be expected given recent advances in sources, instrumentation and computational power and methods. Crystallography, solution scattering, dynamics, membranes, labeling and imaging are examined. For the extraction of maximum information, the incorporation of judicious specific deuterium labeling, the integration of several types of experiment, and interpretation using high-performance computer simulation models are often found to be particularly powerful.},
doi = {10.1107/S2059798318017503},
journal = {Acta Crystallographica. Section D. Structural Biology},
issn = {2059-7983},
number = 12,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}