skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Device-scale CFD study for mass transfer coefficient and effective mass transfer area in packed column

Abstract

Carbon dioxide (CO 2) is a significant contributor of greenhouse gases emissions responsible for global warming. The fossil-fueled power plant is one of the major sources of CO 2 emission worldwide and needs to be mitigated. Post-combustion carbon capture by chemical absorption can be a promising technology to reduce CO 2 emission from power plants. The absorption is carried out via countercurrent flow in the packed columns. Although monoethanolamine (MEA) is a popular solvent, it has also limitations such as high volatility of solvent, corrosivity that leads to product degradation and damage to apparatuses, low CO 2 loading capacity, etc. Therefore, alternate solvents are being explored as prospective materials for carbon capture. A water-lean solvent, CO 2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOL), is currently being developed as a prospective material in carbon capture at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Since the development of the material is at the primitive stage, it needs extensive investigation before industrial deployments. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer phenomena in the packed column using CO 2BOL is unknown. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be a useful tool to understand these phenomena in the packed column. Before employing the extensive CFD investigations, one needs to carefully validate CFD predictionsmore » for accurate flow predictions. This report demonstrates the validation of multiphase flow simulations against the experimental results for both structured and random packed columns. The reactive multiphase flow simulations using volume of fluid method were conducted at a wide range of liquid loads and contacts angles. The effective area is one of the critical factors dictating interphase mass transfer due to chemical reactions. Accordingly, CFD-predicted effective areas were compared with the experimental results of Tsai et al. [1] for Mellapak 250.Y structured packing. Both results matched well at different liquid loads in the presence of fast chemical kinetics using caustic solvents. Further, reactive multiphase flow simulations were also conducted in pall ring random packing to compute effective areas in the presence of fast chemical reactions. The CFD-predicted effective area compared well with correlation developed by Song et al. [2]. With successful validations, the current simulation framework can be further used for prediction of hydrodynamics and mass transfer phenomena using CO 2BOL solvents in the packed column. Subsequently, it would be helpful in design optimization of a packed column. In addition to validation of the CFD model, this report also explains the mechanism for enhanced liquid side mass transfer for a structured packed column as compared to the wetted wall column.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1492447
Report Number(s):
PNNL-28161
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CFD; Mass transfer area; Random Packing; structured packing

Citation Formats

Singh, Rajesh K., Bao, Jie, Wang, Chao, and Xu, Zhijie. Device-scale CFD study for mass transfer coefficient and effective mass transfer area in packed column. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1492447.
Singh, Rajesh K., Bao, Jie, Wang, Chao, & Xu, Zhijie. Device-scale CFD study for mass transfer coefficient and effective mass transfer area in packed column. United States. doi:10.2172/1492447.
Singh, Rajesh K., Bao, Jie, Wang, Chao, and Xu, Zhijie. Tue . "Device-scale CFD study for mass transfer coefficient and effective mass transfer area in packed column". United States. doi:10.2172/1492447. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1492447.
@article{osti_1492447,
title = {Device-scale CFD study for mass transfer coefficient and effective mass transfer area in packed column},
author = {Singh, Rajesh K. and Bao, Jie and Wang, Chao and Xu, Zhijie},
abstractNote = {Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a significant contributor of greenhouse gases emissions responsible for global warming. The fossil-fueled power plant is one of the major sources of CO2 emission worldwide and needs to be mitigated. Post-combustion carbon capture by chemical absorption can be a promising technology to reduce CO2 emission from power plants. The absorption is carried out via countercurrent flow in the packed columns. Although monoethanolamine (MEA) is a popular solvent, it has also limitations such as high volatility of solvent, corrosivity that leads to product degradation and damage to apparatuses, low CO2 loading capacity, etc. Therefore, alternate solvents are being explored as prospective materials for carbon capture. A water-lean solvent, CO2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOL), is currently being developed as a prospective material in carbon capture at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Since the development of the material is at the primitive stage, it needs extensive investigation before industrial deployments. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer phenomena in the packed column using CO2BOL is unknown. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be a useful tool to understand these phenomena in the packed column. Before employing the extensive CFD investigations, one needs to carefully validate CFD predictions for accurate flow predictions. This report demonstrates the validation of multiphase flow simulations against the experimental results for both structured and random packed columns. The reactive multiphase flow simulations using volume of fluid method were conducted at a wide range of liquid loads and contacts angles. The effective area is one of the critical factors dictating interphase mass transfer due to chemical reactions. Accordingly, CFD-predicted effective areas were compared with the experimental results of Tsai et al. [1] for Mellapak 250.Y structured packing. Both results matched well at different liquid loads in the presence of fast chemical kinetics using caustic solvents. Further, reactive multiphase flow simulations were also conducted in pall ring random packing to compute effective areas in the presence of fast chemical reactions. The CFD-predicted effective area compared well with correlation developed by Song et al. [2]. With successful validations, the current simulation framework can be further used for prediction of hydrodynamics and mass transfer phenomena using CO2BOL solvents in the packed column. Subsequently, it would be helpful in design optimization of a packed column. In addition to validation of the CFD model, this report also explains the mechanism for enhanced liquid side mass transfer for a structured packed column as compared to the wetted wall column.},
doi = {10.2172/1492447},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}