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Title: Modulating factors of hydrologic exchanges in a large-scale river reach: Insights from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations

Abstract

Hyporheic exchange is a critical mechanism shaping hydrological and biogeochemical processes along a river corridor. Recent studies on quantifying the hyporheic exchange were mostly limited to local scales due to field inaccessibility, computational demand, and complexity of geomorphology and subsurface geology. Surface flow conditions and subsurface physical properties are well known factors on modulating the hyporheic exchange, but quantitative understanding of their impacts on the strength and direction of hyporheic exchanges at reach scales is absent. In this study, a high resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that couples surface and subsurface flow and transport is employed to simulate hyporheic exchanges in a 7-km long reach along the main-stem of the Columbia River. Assuming that the hyporheic exchange does not affect surface water flow conditions due to its negligible magnitude compared to the volume and velocity of river water, we developed a one-way coupled surface and subsurface water flow model using the commercial CFD software STAR-CCM+. The model integrates the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation solver with a realizable k-e two-layer turbulence model, a two-layer all y^+ wall treatment, and the volume of fluid (VOF) method, and is used to simulate hyporheic exchanges by tracking the free water-air interface as wellmore » as flow in the river and the subsurface porous media. The model is validated against measurements from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) in the stream water and hyporheic fluxes derived from a set of temperature profilers installed across the riverbed. The validated model is then employed to systematically investigate how hyporheic exchanges are influenced by surface water fluid dynamics strongly regulated by upstream dam operations, as well as subsurface structures (e.g. thickness of riverbed and subsurface formation layers) and hydrogeological properties (e.g. permeability). The results suggest that the thickness of riverbed alluvium layer is the dominant factor for reach-scale hyporheic exchanges, followed by the alluvium permeability, the depth of the underlying impermeable layer, and the assumption of hydrostatic pressure.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States of America
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico United States of America
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1492446
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123673
Journal ID: ISSN 0885-6087
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Hydrological Processes
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 23; Journal ID: ISSN 0885-6087
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bao, Jie, Zhou, Tian, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Perkins, William, Harding, Samuel, Titzler, Scott, Hammond, Glenn, Ren, Huiying, Thorne, Paul, Suffield, Sarah, Murray, Christopher, and Zachara, John. Modulating factors of hydrologic exchanges in a large-scale river reach: Insights from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/hyp.13266.
Bao, Jie, Zhou, Tian, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Perkins, William, Harding, Samuel, Titzler, Scott, Hammond, Glenn, Ren, Huiying, Thorne, Paul, Suffield, Sarah, Murray, Christopher, & Zachara, John. Modulating factors of hydrologic exchanges in a large-scale river reach: Insights from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations. United States. doi:10.1002/hyp.13266.
Bao, Jie, Zhou, Tian, Huang, Maoyi, Hou, Zhangshuan, Perkins, William, Harding, Samuel, Titzler, Scott, Hammond, Glenn, Ren, Huiying, Thorne, Paul, Suffield, Sarah, Murray, Christopher, and Zachara, John. Tue . "Modulating factors of hydrologic exchanges in a large-scale river reach: Insights from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations". United States. doi:10.1002/hyp.13266.
@article{osti_1492446,
title = {Modulating factors of hydrologic exchanges in a large-scale river reach: Insights from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations},
author = {Bao, Jie and Zhou, Tian and Huang, Maoyi and Hou, Zhangshuan and Perkins, William and Harding, Samuel and Titzler, Scott and Hammond, Glenn and Ren, Huiying and Thorne, Paul and Suffield, Sarah and Murray, Christopher and Zachara, John},
abstractNote = {Hyporheic exchange is a critical mechanism shaping hydrological and biogeochemical processes along a river corridor. Recent studies on quantifying the hyporheic exchange were mostly limited to local scales due to field inaccessibility, computational demand, and complexity of geomorphology and subsurface geology. Surface flow conditions and subsurface physical properties are well known factors on modulating the hyporheic exchange, but quantitative understanding of their impacts on the strength and direction of hyporheic exchanges at reach scales is absent. In this study, a high resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that couples surface and subsurface flow and transport is employed to simulate hyporheic exchanges in a 7-km long reach along the main-stem of the Columbia River. Assuming that the hyporheic exchange does not affect surface water flow conditions due to its negligible magnitude compared to the volume and velocity of river water, we developed a one-way coupled surface and subsurface water flow model using the commercial CFD software STAR-CCM+. The model integrates the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation solver with a realizable k-e two-layer turbulence model, a two-layer all y^+ wall treatment, and the volume of fluid (VOF) method, and is used to simulate hyporheic exchanges by tracking the free water-air interface as well as flow in the river and the subsurface porous media. The model is validated against measurements from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) in the stream water and hyporheic fluxes derived from a set of temperature profilers installed across the riverbed. The validated model is then employed to systematically investigate how hyporheic exchanges are influenced by surface water fluid dynamics strongly regulated by upstream dam operations, as well as subsurface structures (e.g. thickness of riverbed and subsurface formation layers) and hydrogeological properties (e.g. permeability). The results suggest that the thickness of riverbed alluvium layer is the dominant factor for reach-scale hyporheic exchanges, followed by the alluvium permeability, the depth of the underlying impermeable layer, and the assumption of hydrostatic pressure.},
doi = {10.1002/hyp.13266},
journal = {Hydrological Processes},
issn = {0885-6087},
number = 23,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

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