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Title: Electrogenerative Reactors for Process Intensified Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel from Shale Gas

Abstract

With the abundance of natural gas and its primary components of methane, ethane and propane, there is the opportunity to convert these light alkanes to higher-value products. The growth in natural gas supply in the U.S. has increased substantially since the mid-2000s due to advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. As petroleum prices are volatile, natural gas resources are progressively attractive as alternative fuel sources. However, many of these shale gas wells are in regions of the U.S. that are remote and costly to transport to petrochemical and refining centers. In addition, much of this shale gas is “wet gas” that contains condensable amounts of ethane. While dedicated ethane gas pipelines have been built to get a small fraction of this gas to market, they are very capital intensive and compete for existing land use. As a result of this Phase I project, we developed a process to convert ethane to a transportable liquid fuel. This was achieved by implementing process intensification for this gas-to-liquids approach; we use novel eletrogenerative reactors in a two-step process rather than multi-step well-known technologies such as Fisher-Tropsch synthesis. These reactors borrow on well proven solid oxide fuel cell technology. Therefore, when produced inmore » mass will be a very low-cost modular chemical reactor. This project demonstrated that EcoCatlaytic’s catalysts are highly selective towards ethylene and are compatible with anode materials. These integrated catalysts with the anode were able to maintain stable activity under ethane. Process simulations demonstrate an energy savings while producing gasoline and electricity for a modular system that produces 1,000 bbl/day gasoline. The system, not only produces gasoline, but also generates electricity which is a very valuable commodity in the remote shale gas facilities. This process could potentially allow remote natural gas producers to upgrade their feedstock to valuable gasoline on-site rather than flaring.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Bio2Electric, LLC
  2. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bio2electric, LLC, Princeton, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1491597
Report Number(s):
DOE-Bio2Electric-18484
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0018484
Type / Phase:
STTR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; ethane, ODH, oxidative dehydrogenation, ethylene, gasoline, diesel, electrogenerative; solid oxide fuel cell

Citation Formats

Chung, Elena, Li, Wenyuan, Ma, Liang, Sofranko, John A, and Liu, Xingbo. Electrogenerative Reactors for Process Intensified Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel from Shale Gas. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Chung, Elena, Li, Wenyuan, Ma, Liang, Sofranko, John A, & Liu, Xingbo. Electrogenerative Reactors for Process Intensified Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel from Shale Gas. United States.
Chung, Elena, Li, Wenyuan, Ma, Liang, Sofranko, John A, and Liu, Xingbo. Tue . "Electrogenerative Reactors for Process Intensified Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel from Shale Gas". United States.
@article{osti_1491597,
title = {Electrogenerative Reactors for Process Intensified Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel from Shale Gas},
author = {Chung, Elena and Li, Wenyuan and Ma, Liang and Sofranko, John A and Liu, Xingbo},
abstractNote = {With the abundance of natural gas and its primary components of methane, ethane and propane, there is the opportunity to convert these light alkanes to higher-value products. The growth in natural gas supply in the U.S. has increased substantially since the mid-2000s due to advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. As petroleum prices are volatile, natural gas resources are progressively attractive as alternative fuel sources. However, many of these shale gas wells are in regions of the U.S. that are remote and costly to transport to petrochemical and refining centers. In addition, much of this shale gas is “wet gas” that contains condensable amounts of ethane. While dedicated ethane gas pipelines have been built to get a small fraction of this gas to market, they are very capital intensive and compete for existing land use. As a result of this Phase I project, we developed a process to convert ethane to a transportable liquid fuel. This was achieved by implementing process intensification for this gas-to-liquids approach; we use novel eletrogenerative reactors in a two-step process rather than multi-step well-known technologies such as Fisher-Tropsch synthesis. These reactors borrow on well proven solid oxide fuel cell technology. Therefore, when produced in mass will be a very low-cost modular chemical reactor. This project demonstrated that EcoCatlaytic’s catalysts are highly selective towards ethylene and are compatible with anode materials. These integrated catalysts with the anode were able to maintain stable activity under ethane. Process simulations demonstrate an energy savings while producing gasoline and electricity for a modular system that produces 1,000 bbl/day gasoline. The system, not only produces gasoline, but also generates electricity which is a very valuable commodity in the remote shale gas facilities. This process could potentially allow remote natural gas producers to upgrade their feedstock to valuable gasoline on-site rather than flaring.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as January 22, 2023
Other availability
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