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Title: Airborne measurements of boundary layer chemistry during the Southern Oxidant Study: A case study

Abstract

We report that measurements of chemical and meteorological variables were made at several altitudes over a surface chemistry site near Nashville, Tennessee, during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study. The measurements were designed to reveal the effects of turbulent mixing on atmospheric chemistry. They were made under conditions of clear skies and light winds during the morning transition from nocturnal stable stratification to the afternoon convective mixed layer. Early morning ozone mixing ratios measured by the aircraft were ~70 parts per billion (ppb), while those measured by surface instrumentation were ~25 ppb. Corresponding to growth of the morning turbulent layer, surface ozone values steadily increase with time until they matched the 70 ppb values aloft by midmorning. The mixing ratios of isoprene at altitudes above the surface increased by several orders of magnitude with the onset of turbulence at each measurement altitude. The slope of O 3 as a function of NO y for each of the flight legs was also sensitive to the presence of turbulence. Measurements from nonturbulent flight legs yielded slopes that were considerably steeper than those from measurements made in turbulence. Lastly, this study shows that the concentration of ozone precursors aloft is clearly dependent on themore » presence of turbulence, and turbulent mixing could explain the evolution of ozone concentrations at the surface. In general, conclusions regarding pollutant concentrations must account for both chemical and local dynamic processes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1491163
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-27690
Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: D11; Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Berkowitz, Carl M., and Shaw, William J. Airborne measurements of boundary layer chemistry during the Southern Oxidant Study: A case study. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1029/97JD00417.
Berkowitz, Carl M., & Shaw, William J. Airborne measurements of boundary layer chemistry during the Southern Oxidant Study: A case study. United States. doi:10.1029/97JD00417.
Berkowitz, Carl M., and Shaw, William J. Sun . "Airborne measurements of boundary layer chemistry during the Southern Oxidant Study: A case study". United States. doi:10.1029/97JD00417. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491163.
@article{osti_1491163,
title = {Airborne measurements of boundary layer chemistry during the Southern Oxidant Study: A case study},
author = {Berkowitz, Carl M. and Shaw, William J.},
abstractNote = {We report that measurements of chemical and meteorological variables were made at several altitudes over a surface chemistry site near Nashville, Tennessee, during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study. The measurements were designed to reveal the effects of turbulent mixing on atmospheric chemistry. They were made under conditions of clear skies and light winds during the morning transition from nocturnal stable stratification to the afternoon convective mixed layer. Early morning ozone mixing ratios measured by the aircraft were ~70 parts per billion (ppb), while those measured by surface instrumentation were ~25 ppb. Corresponding to growth of the morning turbulent layer, surface ozone values steadily increase with time until they matched the 70 ppb values aloft by midmorning. The mixing ratios of isoprene at altitudes above the surface increased by several orders of magnitude with the onset of turbulence at each measurement altitude. The slope of O3 as a function of NOy for each of the flight legs was also sensitive to the presence of turbulence. Measurements from nonturbulent flight legs yielded slopes that were considerably steeper than those from measurements made in turbulence. Lastly, this study shows that the concentration of ozone precursors aloft is clearly dependent on the presence of turbulence, and turbulent mixing could explain the evolution of ozone concentrations at the surface. In general, conclusions regarding pollutant concentrations must account for both chemical and local dynamic processes.},
doi = {10.1029/97JD00417},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
issn = {0148-0227},
number = D11,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 13 works
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Map of Nashville and environs showing the Dickson site over which the measurement presented in this paper were taken. (Figure based on information provided by Bill Parkhurst, Tennesse Valley Authority.)

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