skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Ultrafast manipulation of mirror domain walls in a charge density wave

Abstract

Domain walls (DWs) are singularities in an ordered medium that often host exotic phenomena such as charge ordering, insulator-metal transition, or superconductivity. The ability to locally write and erase DWs is highly desirable, as it allows one to design material functionality by patterning DWs in specific configurations. We demonstrate such capability at room temperature in a charge density wave (CDW), a macroscopic condensate of electrons and phonons, in ultrathin 1T-TaS 2. A single femtosecond light pulse is shown to locally inject or remove mirror DWs in the CDW condensate, with probabilities tunable by pulse energy and temperature. Using time-resolved electron diffraction, we are able to simultaneously track anti-synchronized CDW amplitude oscillations from both the lattice and the condensate, where photoinjected DWs lead to a red-shifted frequency. Our demonstration of reversible DW manipulation may pave new ways for engineering correlated material systems with light.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Nanoscale Systems
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1490444
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; AC02-05CH11231; DMR-14-19807; GBMF4540; GBMF3848; GBMF4303
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 2375-2548
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Zong, Alfred, Shen, Xiaozhe, Kogar, Anshul, Ye, Linda, Marks, Carolyn, Chowdhury, Debanjan, Rohwer, Timm, Freelon, Byron, Weathersby, Stephen, Li, Renkai, Yang, Jie, Checkelsky, Joseph, Wang, Xijie, and Gedik, Nuh. Ultrafast manipulation of mirror domain walls in a charge density wave. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aau5501.
Zong, Alfred, Shen, Xiaozhe, Kogar, Anshul, Ye, Linda, Marks, Carolyn, Chowdhury, Debanjan, Rohwer, Timm, Freelon, Byron, Weathersby, Stephen, Li, Renkai, Yang, Jie, Checkelsky, Joseph, Wang, Xijie, & Gedik, Nuh. Ultrafast manipulation of mirror domain walls in a charge density wave. United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aau5501.
Zong, Alfred, Shen, Xiaozhe, Kogar, Anshul, Ye, Linda, Marks, Carolyn, Chowdhury, Debanjan, Rohwer, Timm, Freelon, Byron, Weathersby, Stephen, Li, Renkai, Yang, Jie, Checkelsky, Joseph, Wang, Xijie, and Gedik, Nuh. Fri . "Ultrafast manipulation of mirror domain walls in a charge density wave". United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aau5501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1490444.
@article{osti_1490444,
title = {Ultrafast manipulation of mirror domain walls in a charge density wave},
author = {Zong, Alfred and Shen, Xiaozhe and Kogar, Anshul and Ye, Linda and Marks, Carolyn and Chowdhury, Debanjan and Rohwer, Timm and Freelon, Byron and Weathersby, Stephen and Li, Renkai and Yang, Jie and Checkelsky, Joseph and Wang, Xijie and Gedik, Nuh},
abstractNote = {Domain walls (DWs) are singularities in an ordered medium that often host exotic phenomena such as charge ordering, insulator-metal transition, or superconductivity. The ability to locally write and erase DWs is highly desirable, as it allows one to design material functionality by patterning DWs in specific configurations. We demonstrate such capability at room temperature in a charge density wave (CDW), a macroscopic condensate of electrons and phonons, in ultrathin 1T-TaS2. A single femtosecond light pulse is shown to locally inject or remove mirror DWs in the CDW condensate, with probabilities tunable by pulse energy and temperature. Using time-resolved electron diffraction, we are able to simultaneously track anti-synchronized CDW amplitude oscillations from both the lattice and the condensate, where photoinjected DWs lead to a red-shifted frequency. Our demonstration of reversible DW manipulation may pave new ways for engineering correlated material systems with light.},
doi = {10.1126/sciadv.aau5501},
journal = {Science Advances},
issn = {2375-2548},
number = 10,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Structural phases of 1T-TaS2 and its two mirror-symmetric commensurate states. (A) Temperature-dependent resistivity measured during cooldown (blue) and warm-up (red), showing hysteretic discontinuities as 1T-TaS2 transitions through incommensurate (IC), nearly commensurate (NC), and commensurate (C) CDW phases. The triclinic phase during warm-up (223 to 283 K) is omitted.more » Lower inset: Schematic diffraction pattern in CDW phases, with a central Bragg peak surrounded by six first-order superlattice peaks. Filled (dashed) circles represent a (b) orientation in the C or NC phase. Upper inset: Static diffraction patterns of the (2 0 0) Bragg and satellite peaks taken at 295 and 370 K. Only the a domain is present throughout the sample. (B) Schematics of in-plane atomic arrangements in commensurate regions for α (top) or β (bottom) state that breaks the in-plane mirror symmetry. Orange spheres denote Ta atoms, which form clusters of regular hexagrams. Blue diamonds represent unit cells of the √13 x √13 superlattice.« less

Save / Share:
Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.