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Title: Final Report: Modeling coupled ice sheet-ocean interactions in the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and in DOE Earth System Models

Abstract

Ice sheet-ocean interactions are involved in a potential climate tipping point in the climate system. Weakening of dynamical ocean barriers that currently hold warmer waters off the Antarctic continental shelf could lead to warming under Antarctica’s largest ice shelves, causing as much as a hundredfold increase in sub-ice-shelf melting. Increased ice-sheet melting could trigger dynamical instabilities in the ice sheet itself if sufficient buttressing from ice shelves is lost. This project developed and tested several modeling capabilities needed to investigate these phenomena. In collaboration with a number of international groups, notably the climate modeling group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the following capabilities were added to the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) and its ocean component (the Model for Prediction Across Scales Ocean, MPAS-Ocean): 1) a new vertical coordinate appropriate for ice-shelf cavities; 2) an initialization procedure appropriate for damping waves from imbalances in ocean pressure and that of the overlying ice shelf; 3) A suite of idealized test cases related to ice shelf-ocean interactions; 4) A set of diagnostics for tracking freshwater fluxes and heat budgets from ice-shelf melting; 5) infrastructure for computing ice sheet-ocean fluxes in the E3SM coupler; and 6) A set of analysis andmore » visualization tools for E3SM ocean and sea-ice validation with a particular focus on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate. Additionally, the project included participation and leadership in a number of international model intercomparison projects (MIPs). Most notably, the PI was a co-chair of the Marine Ice Sheet-Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (MISOMIP), designing the experiment, coordinating participation in the MIP and performing the bulk of the analysis. Although the project was cut short when the PI accepted a staff scientist position at LANL, the project played a role in seven publications and has segued smoothly into ongoing Department of Energy projects in the “ecosystem” surrounding E3SM.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam (Germany)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1490084
Report Number(s):
DOE-PIK-13038
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0013038
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate modeling; ice sheet-ocean interactions; Antarctica; Southern Ocean; E3SM; MPAS

Citation Formats

Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm. Final Report: Modeling coupled ice sheet-ocean interactions in the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and in DOE Earth System Models. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1490084.
Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm. Final Report: Modeling coupled ice sheet-ocean interactions in the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and in DOE Earth System Models. United States. doi:10.2172/1490084.
Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm. Wed . "Final Report: Modeling coupled ice sheet-ocean interactions in the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and in DOE Earth System Models". United States. doi:10.2172/1490084. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1490084.
@article{osti_1490084,
title = {Final Report: Modeling coupled ice sheet-ocean interactions in the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and in DOE Earth System Models},
author = {Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm},
abstractNote = {Ice sheet-ocean interactions are involved in a potential climate tipping point in the climate system. Weakening of dynamical ocean barriers that currently hold warmer waters off the Antarctic continental shelf could lead to warming under Antarctica’s largest ice shelves, causing as much as a hundredfold increase in sub-ice-shelf melting. Increased ice-sheet melting could trigger dynamical instabilities in the ice sheet itself if sufficient buttressing from ice shelves is lost. This project developed and tested several modeling capabilities needed to investigate these phenomena. In collaboration with a number of international groups, notably the climate modeling group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the following capabilities were added to the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) and its ocean component (the Model for Prediction Across Scales Ocean, MPAS-Ocean): 1) a new vertical coordinate appropriate for ice-shelf cavities; 2) an initialization procedure appropriate for damping waves from imbalances in ocean pressure and that of the overlying ice shelf; 3) A suite of idealized test cases related to ice shelf-ocean interactions; 4) A set of diagnostics for tracking freshwater fluxes and heat budgets from ice-shelf melting; 5) infrastructure for computing ice sheet-ocean fluxes in the E3SM coupler; and 6) A set of analysis and visualization tools for E3SM ocean and sea-ice validation with a particular focus on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate. Additionally, the project included participation and leadership in a number of international model intercomparison projects (MIPs). Most notably, the PI was a co-chair of the Marine Ice Sheet-Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (MISOMIP), designing the experiment, coordinating participation in the MIP and performing the bulk of the analysis. Although the project was cut short when the PI accepted a staff scientist position at LANL, the project played a role in seven publications and has segued smoothly into ongoing Department of Energy projects in the “ecosystem” surrounding E3SM.},
doi = {10.2172/1490084},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}