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Title: Lessons learned from the pioneering hot dry rock project at Fenton Hill, USA

Abstract

Interest in geothermal energy production has grown rapidly in recent years due to the increasing demand for clean, renewable, domestic energy. Recent publications have suggested that geothermal energy from Enhanced Geothermal Systems could satisfy a large portion of the energy needs in the U.S. if the technology were implemented on a large scale. Pertinent to this goal are many of the lessons learned from the pioneering Hot Dry Rock project aimed at producing usable energy form the heat of the earth, conducted from 1970 to 1995 at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, USA. During this project, the Los Alamos National Laboratory created and tested two reservoirs at depths in the range of 2.8–3.5 km in crystalline rock formations underlying the Fenton Hill site. Thermal energies in the range of 3–10 MWt were produced demonstrating the technical feasibility of the concept. Many important lessons were learned regarding the creation, engineering and operation of such subsurface systems—these lessons will prove valuable as the geothermal community moves towards the goal of realizing the immense potential of this ubiquitous renewable energy resource. The purpose here is to provide a brief, easy to read overview of this pioneering project.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1489943
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1374666
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-21133
Journal ID: ISSN 0375-6505
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geothermics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 63; Journal ID: ISSN 0375-6505
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; EGS; HDR; Fenton Hill; stimulation; field test

Citation Formats

Kelkar, Sharad, WoldeGabriel, Giday, and Rehfeldt, Kenneth. Lessons learned from the pioneering hot dry rock project at Fenton Hill, USA. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2015.08.008.
Kelkar, Sharad, WoldeGabriel, Giday, & Rehfeldt, Kenneth. Lessons learned from the pioneering hot dry rock project at Fenton Hill, USA. United States. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2015.08.008.
Kelkar, Sharad, WoldeGabriel, Giday, and Rehfeldt, Kenneth. Fri . "Lessons learned from the pioneering hot dry rock project at Fenton Hill, USA". United States. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2015.08.008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1489943.
@article{osti_1489943,
title = {Lessons learned from the pioneering hot dry rock project at Fenton Hill, USA},
author = {Kelkar, Sharad and WoldeGabriel, Giday and Rehfeldt, Kenneth},
abstractNote = {Interest in geothermal energy production has grown rapidly in recent years due to the increasing demand for clean, renewable, domestic energy. Recent publications have suggested that geothermal energy from Enhanced Geothermal Systems could satisfy a large portion of the energy needs in the U.S. if the technology were implemented on a large scale. Pertinent to this goal are many of the lessons learned from the pioneering Hot Dry Rock project aimed at producing usable energy form the heat of the earth, conducted from 1970 to 1995 at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, USA. During this project, the Los Alamos National Laboratory created and tested two reservoirs at depths in the range of 2.8–3.5 km in crystalline rock formations underlying the Fenton Hill site. Thermal energies in the range of 3–10 MWt were produced demonstrating the technical feasibility of the concept. Many important lessons were learned regarding the creation, engineering and operation of such subsurface systems—these lessons will prove valuable as the geothermal community moves towards the goal of realizing the immense potential of this ubiquitous renewable energy resource. The purpose here is to provide a brief, easy to read overview of this pioneering project.},
doi = {10.1016/j.geothermics.2015.08.008},
journal = {Geothermics},
number = ,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Fri Oct 16 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 6 works
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