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Title: Science questions and knowledge gaps to study microbial transport and survival in Asian and African dust plumes reaching North America

Abstract

The Sahara in North Africa and the Gobi and Takla Makan deserts in Asia are the primary sources of mobilized dust in the atmosphere, with regional or global airborne transport estimated at 2 to 5 billion tonnes per year. Annual Asian dust plumes take about 7 to 10 d to cross the Pacific Ocean, and often reach the northwest USA between late February and May. In contrast, the peak season for the movement of African dust storms to the southeastern USA is typically June to August, and dust plumes take about 5 to 7 d to reach Florida. Although studies have documented that a wide range of bacteria, fungi, and viruses in dust plumes reach the USA each year, little is known about temporal and spatial variability in the microbial biodiversity in transoceanic dust plumes, or the effect on the deposition environments. A scoping study (called the Transoceanic Aerobiology Biodiversity Study; TABS) was recently conducted to develop field-based campaigns centered on examining the abundance, diversity, survival, and impact of microorganisms in transoceanic dust plumes arriving in the continental USA from Asia and Africa. This effort identified Science Questions (SQs) and Knowledge Gaps (KGs) that are highly relevant towards an understandingmore » of the microbial diversity, transport, survival and dispersal in transoceanic dusts. Science Questions were defined as broad science topics in transoceanic dust plume microbiology that were underexplored by the aerobiology community. Knowledge Gaps were defined as specific project-level research questions for each SQ that represented important topics in the study of transoceanic aerobiology. Our approach aimed to establish a foundation for future microbiological investigations of Asian and African dust plumes in an international and coordinated manner.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1489251
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-133720
Journal ID: ISSN 0393-5965
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Aerobiologia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0393-5965
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
dust aerosol, biological aerosol, microbial aerosols, Aerosol Transport, desert aerosols, transoceanic dust, aerobiology, dust transport, Asian dust, African dust

Citation Formats

Schuerger, Andrew C., Smith, David J., Griffin, Dale W., Jaffe, Daniel A., Wawrik, Boris, Burrows, Susannah M., Christner, Brent C., Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina, Lipp, Erin K., Schmale III, David G., and Yu, Hongbin. Science questions and knowledge gaps to study microbial transport and survival in Asian and African dust plumes reaching North America. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1007/s10453-018-9541-7.
Schuerger, Andrew C., Smith, David J., Griffin, Dale W., Jaffe, Daniel A., Wawrik, Boris, Burrows, Susannah M., Christner, Brent C., Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina, Lipp, Erin K., Schmale III, David G., & Yu, Hongbin. Science questions and knowledge gaps to study microbial transport and survival in Asian and African dust plumes reaching North America. United States. doi:10.1007/s10453-018-9541-7.
Schuerger, Andrew C., Smith, David J., Griffin, Dale W., Jaffe, Daniel A., Wawrik, Boris, Burrows, Susannah M., Christner, Brent C., Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina, Lipp, Erin K., Schmale III, David G., and Yu, Hongbin. Tue . "Science questions and knowledge gaps to study microbial transport and survival in Asian and African dust plumes reaching North America". United States. doi:10.1007/s10453-018-9541-7.
@article{osti_1489251,
title = {Science questions and knowledge gaps to study microbial transport and survival in Asian and African dust plumes reaching North America},
author = {Schuerger, Andrew C. and Smith, David J. and Griffin, Dale W. and Jaffe, Daniel A. and Wawrik, Boris and Burrows, Susannah M. and Christner, Brent C. and Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina and Lipp, Erin K. and Schmale III, David G. and Yu, Hongbin},
abstractNote = {The Sahara in North Africa and the Gobi and Takla Makan deserts in Asia are the primary sources of mobilized dust in the atmosphere, with regional or global airborne transport estimated at 2 to 5 billion tonnes per year. Annual Asian dust plumes take about 7 to 10 d to cross the Pacific Ocean, and often reach the northwest USA between late February and May. In contrast, the peak season for the movement of African dust storms to the southeastern USA is typically June to August, and dust plumes take about 5 to 7 d to reach Florida. Although studies have documented that a wide range of bacteria, fungi, and viruses in dust plumes reach the USA each year, little is known about temporal and spatial variability in the microbial biodiversity in transoceanic dust plumes, or the effect on the deposition environments. A scoping study (called the Transoceanic Aerobiology Biodiversity Study; TABS) was recently conducted to develop field-based campaigns centered on examining the abundance, diversity, survival, and impact of microorganisms in transoceanic dust plumes arriving in the continental USA from Asia and Africa. This effort identified Science Questions (SQs) and Knowledge Gaps (KGs) that are highly relevant towards an understanding of the microbial diversity, transport, survival and dispersal in transoceanic dusts. Science Questions were defined as broad science topics in transoceanic dust plume microbiology that were underexplored by the aerobiology community. Knowledge Gaps were defined as specific project-level research questions for each SQ that represented important topics in the study of transoceanic aerobiology. Our approach aimed to establish a foundation for future microbiological investigations of Asian and African dust plumes in an international and coordinated manner.},
doi = {10.1007/s10453-018-9541-7},
journal = {Aerobiologia},
issn = {0393-5965},
number = 4,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}