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Title: Production of high oil, transgene free Camelina sativa plants through genome editing

Abstract

The objective of this project was to develop a Camelina sativa feedstock with significantly increased seed yield and oil content to maximize oil yields per acre. Camelina is an oilseed crop with high potential as a bioenergy feedstock due to its high oil content, low inputs for cultivation, frost tolerance, and short growth cycle (80-110 days). To accelerate market entry, a next generation technology was used to develop GMO free plants to provide an expedited path through regulatory approval. This is anticipated to significantly decrease the time and thus the costs of commercialization of these lines. For this program current Camelina lines were considered to yield, on average, 1500 lbs of seed per acre and possess a seed oil content of 40%. The program had two oil production benchmarks: (1) increase production of seed to 2500 lbs/acre with seed containing 45% oil, and (2) increase production of seed to 3500 lbs/acre with seed containing 60% oil. Hitting the first benchmark would significantly expand the potential of Camelina as a crop and would provide the profitability necessary to incent farmers to grow Camelina, resulting in the production of renewable feedstock for the biobased energy and chemical industries. The second benchmark (3500more » lbs seed/acre with 60% oil content) would have a huge impact on the availability of renewable Camelina oil for the biodiesel and aviation fuel markets. The accomplishments of this program demonstrated that genome editing of multiple targets in Camelina is technically feasible, despite the complexity of the Camelina genome. It also demonstrated that it is possible to increase seed yield while maintaining seed oil content using genome editing. Genome edited lines achieving up to a 40% increase in seed yield were demonstrated in greenhouse growth studies. In separate experiments, the program also achieved increases of up to 38% in the seed oil content of individual seeds. This increased seed oil content was, however, often accompanied by a decrease in seed yield. These observations demonstrate that carbon flow in Camelina can be significantly shifted to seed oil production but that additional research is necessary to concurrently increase/or maintain seed yield. Yield10 plans to continue to build on these results after the BETO program. During the course of this program, Yield10 also demonstrated that lines with single edits, as well as lines with multiple edits, generated using genome editing technology can be designated as non-regulated by USDA-APHIS through their “Am I Regulated?” process. Two separate “Am I Regulated?” letters were submitted to USDA-APHIS and edited Camelina lines described in the letters were deemed non-regulated by the agency demonstrating a reduced regulatory path. The technology developed in this program contributes to the overall understanding of seed oil biosynthesis in oilseed crops and how seed yield and seed oil content can be improved using genome editing techniques. The technology is thus also relevant to increasing seed and oil yield in related oilseed crops, such as canola.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yield10 Bioscience
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1489126
Report Number(s):
YTEN1
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0007003
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Snell, Kristi. Production of high oil, transgene free Camelina sativa plants through genome editing. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1489126.
Snell, Kristi. Production of high oil, transgene free Camelina sativa plants through genome editing. United States. doi:10.2172/1489126.
Snell, Kristi. Sat . "Production of high oil, transgene free Camelina sativa plants through genome editing". United States. doi:10.2172/1489126. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1489126.
@article{osti_1489126,
title = {Production of high oil, transgene free Camelina sativa plants through genome editing},
author = {Snell, Kristi},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project was to develop a Camelina sativa feedstock with significantly increased seed yield and oil content to maximize oil yields per acre. Camelina is an oilseed crop with high potential as a bioenergy feedstock due to its high oil content, low inputs for cultivation, frost tolerance, and short growth cycle (80-110 days). To accelerate market entry, a next generation technology was used to develop GMO free plants to provide an expedited path through regulatory approval. This is anticipated to significantly decrease the time and thus the costs of commercialization of these lines. For this program current Camelina lines were considered to yield, on average, 1500 lbs of seed per acre and possess a seed oil content of 40%. The program had two oil production benchmarks: (1) increase production of seed to 2500 lbs/acre with seed containing 45% oil, and (2) increase production of seed to 3500 lbs/acre with seed containing 60% oil. Hitting the first benchmark would significantly expand the potential of Camelina as a crop and would provide the profitability necessary to incent farmers to grow Camelina, resulting in the production of renewable feedstock for the biobased energy and chemical industries. The second benchmark (3500 lbs seed/acre with 60% oil content) would have a huge impact on the availability of renewable Camelina oil for the biodiesel and aviation fuel markets. The accomplishments of this program demonstrated that genome editing of multiple targets in Camelina is technically feasible, despite the complexity of the Camelina genome. It also demonstrated that it is possible to increase seed yield while maintaining seed oil content using genome editing. Genome edited lines achieving up to a 40% increase in seed yield were demonstrated in greenhouse growth studies. In separate experiments, the program also achieved increases of up to 38% in the seed oil content of individual seeds. This increased seed oil content was, however, often accompanied by a decrease in seed yield. These observations demonstrate that carbon flow in Camelina can be significantly shifted to seed oil production but that additional research is necessary to concurrently increase/or maintain seed yield. Yield10 plans to continue to build on these results after the BETO program. During the course of this program, Yield10 also demonstrated that lines with single edits, as well as lines with multiple edits, generated using genome editing technology can be designated as non-regulated by USDA-APHIS through their “Am I Regulated?” process. Two separate “Am I Regulated?” letters were submitted to USDA-APHIS and edited Camelina lines described in the letters were deemed non-regulated by the agency demonstrating a reduced regulatory path. The technology developed in this program contributes to the overall understanding of seed oil biosynthesis in oilseed crops and how seed yield and seed oil content can be improved using genome editing techniques. The technology is thus also relevant to increasing seed and oil yield in related oilseed crops, such as canola.},
doi = {10.2172/1489126},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}