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Title: Designing for Big Area Additive Manufacturing

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM), more commonly referred to as 3D printing, is revolutionizing the manufacturing industry. With any new technology comes new rules and guidelines for the optimal use of said technology. Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM), developed by Cincinnati Incorporated and Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, requires a host of new design parameters compared to small-scale 3D printing to create large-scale parts. However, BAAM also creates new possibilities in material testing and various applications in the manufacturing industry. Most of the design constraints of small-scale polymer 3D printers still apply to BAAM. Beyond those constraints, new rules and limitations exist because BAAM’s large-scale system significantly changes the thermal properties associated with small-scale AM. Here, this work details both physical and software-related design considerations for additive manufacturing. After reading this guide, one will have a better understanding of slicing software’s capabilities and limitations, different physical characteristics of design and how to apply them appropriately for AM, and how to take the inherent nature of AM into consideration during the design process.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1488707
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Additive Manufacturing
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2214-8604
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Roschli, Alex, Gaul, Katherine T., Boulger, Alex M., Post, Brian K., Chesser, Phillip C., Love, Lonnie J., Blue, Fletcher, and Borish, Michael. Designing for Big Area Additive Manufacturing. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2018.11.006.
Roschli, Alex, Gaul, Katherine T., Boulger, Alex M., Post, Brian K., Chesser, Phillip C., Love, Lonnie J., Blue, Fletcher, & Borish, Michael. Designing for Big Area Additive Manufacturing. United States. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2018.11.006.
Roschli, Alex, Gaul, Katherine T., Boulger, Alex M., Post, Brian K., Chesser, Phillip C., Love, Lonnie J., Blue, Fletcher, and Borish, Michael. Tue . "Designing for Big Area Additive Manufacturing". United States. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2018.11.006.
@article{osti_1488707,
title = {Designing for Big Area Additive Manufacturing},
author = {Roschli, Alex and Gaul, Katherine T. and Boulger, Alex M. and Post, Brian K. and Chesser, Phillip C. and Love, Lonnie J. and Blue, Fletcher and Borish, Michael},
abstractNote = {Additive manufacturing (AM), more commonly referred to as 3D printing, is revolutionizing the manufacturing industry. With any new technology comes new rules and guidelines for the optimal use of said technology. Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM), developed by Cincinnati Incorporated and Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, requires a host of new design parameters compared to small-scale 3D printing to create large-scale parts. However, BAAM also creates new possibilities in material testing and various applications in the manufacturing industry. Most of the design constraints of small-scale polymer 3D printers still apply to BAAM. Beyond those constraints, new rules and limitations exist because BAAM’s large-scale system significantly changes the thermal properties associated with small-scale AM. Here, this work details both physical and software-related design considerations for additive manufacturing. After reading this guide, one will have a better understanding of slicing software’s capabilities and limitations, different physical characteristics of design and how to apply them appropriately for AM, and how to take the inherent nature of AM into consideration during the design process.},
doi = {10.1016/j.addma.2018.11.006},
journal = {Additive Manufacturing},
issn = {2214-8604},
number = C,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 6, 2019
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