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Title: Computed Tomography Scanning and Geophysical Measurements of the Marcellus Formation from the Whipkey ST 1 Well

Abstract

The computed tomography (CT) facilities and the Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Morgantown, West Virginia site were used to characterize core of the Marcellus Formation from a vertical well drilled in Greene County, Pennsylvania by the Energy Corporation of America. The core is from the Whipkey ST 1 well, in the Carmichaels Field, and is comprised primarily of the Marcellus Formation from depths of 7,719 to 7,910.8 ft. Core was provided by Tim Carr and Keithan Martin (West Virginia University and ORISE). The primary impetus of this work is a collaboration between West Virginia University (WVU) and NETL to characterize core from multiple wells to better understand the structure and variation of the Marcellus and Utica Shale Formations. As part of this effort, bulk scans of core were obtained from the Whipkey ST 1 well. This report, and the associated scans, provide detailed datasets not typically available from unconventional shales for analysis. The resultant datasets are presented in this report, and can be accessed from NETL's Energy Data eXchange (EDX) online system using the following link: https://edx.netl.doe.gov/dataset/whipkey-well. All equipment and techniques used were non-destructive, enabling future examinations to be performed on these cores. Nonemore » of the equipment used was suitable for direct visualization of the shale pore space, although fractures and discontinuities were detectable with the methods tested. Low resolution CT imagery with the NETL medical CT scanner was performed on the entire core. Qualitative analysis of the medical CT images, coupled with X-ray fluorescence (XRF), P-wave, and magnetic susceptibility measurements from the MSCL were useful in identifying zones of interest for more detailed analysis as well as fractured zones. The ability to quickly identify key areas for more detailed study with higher resolution will save time and resources in future studies. The combination of methods used provided a multi-scale analysis of this core and provided both a macro and micro description of the core that is relevant for many subsurface energy related examinations that have traditionally been performed at NETL.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); AECOM, Morgantown, WV (United States)
  3. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography
  4. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV, and Albany, OR (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1488437
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-21884
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0004000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Crandall, Dustin, Brown, Sarah, Moore, Johnathan, Mackey, Paige E., and Carr, Tim. Computed Tomography Scanning and Geophysical Measurements of the Marcellus Formation from the Whipkey ST 1 Well. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1488437.
Crandall, Dustin, Brown, Sarah, Moore, Johnathan, Mackey, Paige E., & Carr, Tim. Computed Tomography Scanning and Geophysical Measurements of the Marcellus Formation from the Whipkey ST 1 Well. United States. doi:10.2172/1488437.
Crandall, Dustin, Brown, Sarah, Moore, Johnathan, Mackey, Paige E., and Carr, Tim. Tue . "Computed Tomography Scanning and Geophysical Measurements of the Marcellus Formation from the Whipkey ST 1 Well". United States. doi:10.2172/1488437. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1488437.
@article{osti_1488437,
title = {Computed Tomography Scanning and Geophysical Measurements of the Marcellus Formation from the Whipkey ST 1 Well},
author = {Crandall, Dustin and Brown, Sarah and Moore, Johnathan and Mackey, Paige E. and Carr, Tim},
abstractNote = {The computed tomography (CT) facilities and the Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Morgantown, West Virginia site were used to characterize core of the Marcellus Formation from a vertical well drilled in Greene County, Pennsylvania by the Energy Corporation of America. The core is from the Whipkey ST 1 well, in the Carmichaels Field, and is comprised primarily of the Marcellus Formation from depths of 7,719 to 7,910.8 ft. Core was provided by Tim Carr and Keithan Martin (West Virginia University and ORISE). The primary impetus of this work is a collaboration between West Virginia University (WVU) and NETL to characterize core from multiple wells to better understand the structure and variation of the Marcellus and Utica Shale Formations. As part of this effort, bulk scans of core were obtained from the Whipkey ST 1 well. This report, and the associated scans, provide detailed datasets not typically available from unconventional shales for analysis. The resultant datasets are presented in this report, and can be accessed from NETL's Energy Data eXchange (EDX) online system using the following link: https://edx.netl.doe.gov/dataset/whipkey-well. All equipment and techniques used were non-destructive, enabling future examinations to be performed on these cores. None of the equipment used was suitable for direct visualization of the shale pore space, although fractures and discontinuities were detectable with the methods tested. Low resolution CT imagery with the NETL medical CT scanner was performed on the entire core. Qualitative analysis of the medical CT images, coupled with X-ray fluorescence (XRF), P-wave, and magnetic susceptibility measurements from the MSCL were useful in identifying zones of interest for more detailed analysis as well as fractured zones. The ability to quickly identify key areas for more detailed study with higher resolution will save time and resources in future studies. The combination of methods used provided a multi-scale analysis of this core and provided both a macro and micro description of the core that is relevant for many subsurface energy related examinations that have traditionally been performed at NETL.},
doi = {10.2172/1488437},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}