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Title: Blackcomb2: Hardware-Software Co-design for Nonvolatile Memory in Exascale Systems

Abstract

The impending shift from DRAM and Flash to fast nonvolatile memory (NVM) provides a game-changing opportunity to rethink traditional system architectures; to address their energy inefficiencies; to leverage the new devices for greater performance; and to exploit the new capability of nonvolatility to enhance system resilience, even in the face of larger system scale and degraded reliability of components. Building on the accomplishments of the Blackcomb Project, funded in 2010, we propose to identify, evaluate, and optimize the most promising NVM hardware and software technologies, which are essential to provide the necessary memory capacity, performance, resilience, and energy efficiency in exascale systems. Capacity and energy are the key drivers. Today's pressing application requirements mandate exascale computing; the datasets and concurrency of these applications demand memory capacity that cannot be met by traditional memory technologies. Although charge-based DRAM will endure, experts foresee only modest DRAM capacity gains. And, as moving data between levels of the hierarchy, and storing and accessing data on disk consumes signi ficant energy, a more energy efficient solution is required. We, therefore, posit that exascale systems will need high density, energy-efficient storage technologies, such as nonvolatile memory for access, transformation, and management of exascale data. To addressmore » these issues, in this renewal request, we propose continue the work of our vertically- integrated, focussed team, where our co-design is informed by proxies and interactions with DOE co-design centers. In software, we start by assuming that nonvolatility requires new abstractions and new infrastructure, allowing persistent objects, and delivering performance gains for _le systems and robustness through fast checkpointing. In architecture, we evaluate the tradeoffs of performance and energy by employing a scalable and accurate simulation system to analyze realistic proxy applications. Through this co-design process, we rethink the whole memory architecture, from the cell to the array to the device, with ECC, wearout management, and interfaces. Finally, we provide open source software models of these NVM-based memory systems.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of California at Santa Barbara
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
UCSB
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
Contributing Org.:
University of California at Santa Barbara
OSTI Identifier:
1485357
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0013553
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0013553
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; emerging memory technologies, computing, reliability

Citation Formats

Xie, Yuan. Blackcomb2: Hardware-Software Co-design for Nonvolatile Memory in Exascale Systems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1485357.
Xie, Yuan. Blackcomb2: Hardware-Software Co-design for Nonvolatile Memory in Exascale Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1485357.
Xie, Yuan. Sun . "Blackcomb2: Hardware-Software Co-design for Nonvolatile Memory in Exascale Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1485357. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1485357.
@article{osti_1485357,
title = {Blackcomb2: Hardware-Software Co-design for Nonvolatile Memory in Exascale Systems},
author = {Xie, Yuan},
abstractNote = {The impending shift from DRAM and Flash to fast nonvolatile memory (NVM) provides a game-changing opportunity to rethink traditional system architectures; to address their energy inefficiencies; to leverage the new devices for greater performance; and to exploit the new capability of nonvolatility to enhance system resilience, even in the face of larger system scale and degraded reliability of components. Building on the accomplishments of the Blackcomb Project, funded in 2010, we propose to identify, evaluate, and optimize the most promising NVM hardware and software technologies, which are essential to provide the necessary memory capacity, performance, resilience, and energy efficiency in exascale systems. Capacity and energy are the key drivers. Today's pressing application requirements mandate exascale computing; the datasets and concurrency of these applications demand memory capacity that cannot be met by traditional memory technologies. Although charge-based DRAM will endure, experts foresee only modest DRAM capacity gains. And, as moving data between levels of the hierarchy, and storing and accessing data on disk consumes signi ficant energy, a more energy efficient solution is required. We, therefore, posit that exascale systems will need high density, energy-efficient storage technologies, such as nonvolatile memory for access, transformation, and management of exascale data. To address these issues, in this renewal request, we propose continue the work of our vertically- integrated, focussed team, where our co-design is informed by proxies and interactions with DOE co-design centers. In software, we start by assuming that nonvolatility requires new abstractions and new infrastructure, allowing persistent objects, and delivering performance gains for _le systems and robustness through fast checkpointing. In architecture, we evaluate the tradeoffs of performance and energy by employing a scalable and accurate simulation system to analyze realistic proxy applications. Through this co-design process, we rethink the whole memory architecture, from the cell to the array to the device, with ECC, wearout management, and interfaces. Finally, we provide open source software models of these NVM-based memory systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1485357},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}