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Title: Corrosion Potential of Selected Bio-blendstock Fuel Candidates for Boosted Spark Ignited Engines

Abstract

Eight bio-blendstock fuel candidates for boosted spark ignited engines were evaluated for their susceptibility to corrode infrastructure metals. These candidates included five alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isobutanol, n-propanol, and isopropanol), diisobutylene, mixed furans, and aromatics. Methanol was also added to the list for comparison. These molecules are not corrosive to metals since they cannot dissociate into ions and anions. However, the addition of contaminants and a separate water phase may facilitate corrosion due to phenomena associated with the formation of ions and anions (from key contaminants), differential aeration cell (due to dissolved oxygen), and microbial-induced corrosion. A literature review was conducted to determine the influence of these phenomena on corrosion for the nine fuel candidates. In addition, the oxygen solubility of each fuel type was determined to ascertain their relative influence on forming and enhancing a differential aeration cell. Of the fuel candidates, only the alcohols are water soluble, and therefore have an opportunity to cause corrosion. However, differential aeration cells, by themselves have not been shown to contribute to corrosion. Other factors, such as galvanic coupling and/or crevice regions are necessary to promote corrosion in laboratory conditions. However, differential aeration as a corrosion mechanism has not been established in themore » field. Likewise, microbial-induced corrosion is another known corrosion pathway that has yet to be positively identified for blends of the fuel candidates with gasoline. In summary, corrosion is not anticipated with any of the bio-blendstock candidates with infrastructure metals.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1484989
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2018/1023
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kass, Michael D. Corrosion Potential of Selected Bio-blendstock Fuel Candidates for Boosted Spark Ignited Engines. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1484989.
Kass, Michael D. Corrosion Potential of Selected Bio-blendstock Fuel Candidates for Boosted Spark Ignited Engines. United States. doi:10.2172/1484989.
Kass, Michael D. Sat . "Corrosion Potential of Selected Bio-blendstock Fuel Candidates for Boosted Spark Ignited Engines". United States. doi:10.2172/1484989. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1484989.
@article{osti_1484989,
title = {Corrosion Potential of Selected Bio-blendstock Fuel Candidates for Boosted Spark Ignited Engines},
author = {Kass, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {Eight bio-blendstock fuel candidates for boosted spark ignited engines were evaluated for their susceptibility to corrode infrastructure metals. These candidates included five alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isobutanol, n-propanol, and isopropanol), diisobutylene, mixed furans, and aromatics. Methanol was also added to the list for comparison. These molecules are not corrosive to metals since they cannot dissociate into ions and anions. However, the addition of contaminants and a separate water phase may facilitate corrosion due to phenomena associated with the formation of ions and anions (from key contaminants), differential aeration cell (due to dissolved oxygen), and microbial-induced corrosion. A literature review was conducted to determine the influence of these phenomena on corrosion for the nine fuel candidates. In addition, the oxygen solubility of each fuel type was determined to ascertain their relative influence on forming and enhancing a differential aeration cell. Of the fuel candidates, only the alcohols are water soluble, and therefore have an opportunity to cause corrosion. However, differential aeration cells, by themselves have not been shown to contribute to corrosion. Other factors, such as galvanic coupling and/or crevice regions are necessary to promote corrosion in laboratory conditions. However, differential aeration as a corrosion mechanism has not been established in the field. Likewise, microbial-induced corrosion is another known corrosion pathway that has yet to be positively identified for blends of the fuel candidates with gasoline. In summary, corrosion is not anticipated with any of the bio-blendstock candidates with infrastructure metals.},
doi = {10.2172/1484989},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

Technical Report:

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