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Title: Abiotic stress networks converging on FT2 to control growth in Populus

Abstract

Regulation of growth, quiescence and dormancy by seasonally recurring and episodic environmental factors is of central importance to the productivity of woody plants. Woody biomass feedstock plants such as Populus show substantial natural variation in growth responses to various environmental conditions; however, the complex genetic nature of these traits slows breeding for optimal biomass production in specific climates and on marginal lands. These growth responses are controlled by complex gene regulatory networks that are poorly understood. Elucidating the mechanisms that determine periods of growth and quiescence will identify specific genes and modules that can be manipulated to maximize growth in different environments. The main goal of the project was to develop transcriptional networks that describe spatially and temporally explicit regulatory relationships for both daylength and nutrient-mediated quiescence. We used next generation sequencing to characterize genome-wide gene expression changes to these two abiotic signals in shoot apices, leaf, root and vascular cambium. Overall, we sequenced 270 mRNAseq libraries and 54 smallRNAseq libraries from Populus trichocarpa and 58 RNAseq libraries from Populus nigra. We found both organ-specific transcriptional responses as well as responses common to multiple organs. Similarly, we uncovered both divergent and convergent gene regulatory networks that control growth responses tomore » changes in daylength and nutrient stress. Thus, this work provides a foundation for developing approaches to optimize tree growth and biomass yield in response to specific as well as multiple abiotic conditions. Finally, we validated the functions of candidate regulators of growth in response to photoperiod and nutrient availability by introducing mutations via gene editing and transgenic methods. This data will be available to the public through journal publications and national/international genomic data archives.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1484373
Report Number(s):
DOE-VT-0012574
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012574
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Populus; woody biomass feedstock; transcriptome; gene regulatory networks; nutrient stress responses; photoperiodic responses; phenology; growth regulation; gene-editing

Citation Formats

Brunner, Amy, and Holliday, Jason. Abiotic stress networks converging on FT2 to control growth in Populus. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1484373.
Brunner, Amy, & Holliday, Jason. Abiotic stress networks converging on FT2 to control growth in Populus. United States. doi:10.2172/1484373.
Brunner, Amy, and Holliday, Jason. Tue . "Abiotic stress networks converging on FT2 to control growth in Populus". United States. doi:10.2172/1484373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1484373.
@article{osti_1484373,
title = {Abiotic stress networks converging on FT2 to control growth in Populus},
author = {Brunner, Amy and Holliday, Jason},
abstractNote = {Regulation of growth, quiescence and dormancy by seasonally recurring and episodic environmental factors is of central importance to the productivity of woody plants. Woody biomass feedstock plants such as Populus show substantial natural variation in growth responses to various environmental conditions; however, the complex genetic nature of these traits slows breeding for optimal biomass production in specific climates and on marginal lands. These growth responses are controlled by complex gene regulatory networks that are poorly understood. Elucidating the mechanisms that determine periods of growth and quiescence will identify specific genes and modules that can be manipulated to maximize growth in different environments. The main goal of the project was to develop transcriptional networks that describe spatially and temporally explicit regulatory relationships for both daylength and nutrient-mediated quiescence. We used next generation sequencing to characterize genome-wide gene expression changes to these two abiotic signals in shoot apices, leaf, root and vascular cambium. Overall, we sequenced 270 mRNAseq libraries and 54 smallRNAseq libraries from Populus trichocarpa and 58 RNAseq libraries from Populus nigra. We found both organ-specific transcriptional responses as well as responses common to multiple organs. Similarly, we uncovered both divergent and convergent gene regulatory networks that control growth responses to changes in daylength and nutrient stress. Thus, this work provides a foundation for developing approaches to optimize tree growth and biomass yield in response to specific as well as multiple abiotic conditions. Finally, we validated the functions of candidate regulators of growth in response to photoperiod and nutrient availability by introducing mutations via gene editing and transgenic methods. This data will be available to the public through journal publications and national/international genomic data archives.},
doi = {10.2172/1484373},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}