skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Extreme Scale Unstructured Adaptive CFD: From Multiphase Flow to Aerodynamic Flow Control

Abstract

Understanding the flow of fluid, either liquid or gas, through and around solid bodies has challenged man since the dawn of scientific inquiry. Many of the great minds of science and math have progressively built up a hierarchy of fluid models. This report is concerned with the computational modeling of turbulent flow around aerodynamic bodies such as planes and wind turbines. In this case, viscous effects near the solid bodies create very thin boundary layers that yield highly anisotropic (gradients normal to the surface may be 10^6 times larger than gradients along the surface) solutions to the governing non-linear partial differential equations (PDE); the Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, turbulent flows develop extremely broad ranges of length and time scales.This disparity motivates the use of discretization methods capable of employing adaptivity and implicit time integration. The combination of these features (non-linear, anisotropy, adaptivity, andimplicit) dramatically raise the complexity of the discretization, posing large challenges to efficient scalable parallel implementation. However, through careful design, the more complex algorithms can provide great reductions in computational cost relative to simpler methods (e.g., Cartesian grids with explicit time integration) that are easier to mate efficiently to hardware. In this report, we not only describe our approachmore » but we also address the fact that while complex algorithms may never be as efficient flop-for-flop as simple methods, in the important measure of science-per-core-hour, they can still win big by making complex features like adaptivity and implicit methods as efficient and scalable as possible.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  3. Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)
  4. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  5. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21). Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)
OSTI Identifier:
1483994
Report Number(s):
ANL/ALCF/ESP-17/8
148037
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jansen, Kenneth E., Rasquin, Michel, Evans, John A., Balakrishnan, Ramesh, Williams, Timothy J., Brown, Jed, Carothers, Christopher, Shephard, Mark S., Sahni, Onkar, Smith, Cameron W., Fang, Jun, and Bolotnov, Igor A. Extreme Scale Unstructured Adaptive CFD: From Multiphase Flow to Aerodynamic Flow Control. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1483994.
Jansen, Kenneth E., Rasquin, Michel, Evans, John A., Balakrishnan, Ramesh, Williams, Timothy J., Brown, Jed, Carothers, Christopher, Shephard, Mark S., Sahni, Onkar, Smith, Cameron W., Fang, Jun, & Bolotnov, Igor A. Extreme Scale Unstructured Adaptive CFD: From Multiphase Flow to Aerodynamic Flow Control. United States. doi:10.2172/1483994.
Jansen, Kenneth E., Rasquin, Michel, Evans, John A., Balakrishnan, Ramesh, Williams, Timothy J., Brown, Jed, Carothers, Christopher, Shephard, Mark S., Sahni, Onkar, Smith, Cameron W., Fang, Jun, and Bolotnov, Igor A. Fri . "Extreme Scale Unstructured Adaptive CFD: From Multiphase Flow to Aerodynamic Flow Control". United States. doi:10.2172/1483994. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1483994.
@article{osti_1483994,
title = {Extreme Scale Unstructured Adaptive CFD: From Multiphase Flow to Aerodynamic Flow Control},
author = {Jansen, Kenneth E. and Rasquin, Michel and Evans, John A. and Balakrishnan, Ramesh and Williams, Timothy J. and Brown, Jed and Carothers, Christopher and Shephard, Mark S. and Sahni, Onkar and Smith, Cameron W. and Fang, Jun and Bolotnov, Igor A.},
abstractNote = {Understanding the flow of fluid, either liquid or gas, through and around solid bodies has challenged man since the dawn of scientific inquiry. Many of the great minds of science and math have progressively built up a hierarchy of fluid models. This report is concerned with the computational modeling of turbulent flow around aerodynamic bodies such as planes and wind turbines. In this case, viscous effects near the solid bodies create very thin boundary layers that yield highly anisotropic (gradients normal to the surface may be 10^6 times larger than gradients along the surface) solutions to the governing non-linear partial differential equations (PDE); the Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, turbulent flows develop extremely broad ranges of length and time scales.This disparity motivates the use of discretization methods capable of employing adaptivity and implicit time integration. The combination of these features (non-linear, anisotropy, adaptivity, andimplicit) dramatically raise the complexity of the discretization, posing large challenges to efficient scalable parallel implementation. However, through careful design, the more complex algorithms can provide great reductions in computational cost relative to simpler methods (e.g., Cartesian grids with explicit time integration) that are easier to mate efficiently to hardware. In this report, we not only describe our approach but we also address the fact that while complex algorithms may never be as efficient flop-for-flop as simple methods, in the important measure of science-per-core-hour, they can still win big by making complex features like adaptivity and implicit methods as efficient and scalable as possible.},
doi = {10.2172/1483994},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: