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Title: Genomic dissection of anthracnose resistance response in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]

Abstract

Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is the fifth most important grain crop behind maize, wheat, rice, and barley. Today, it is of interest as a source of fermentable sugars for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, and as a source of biomass for co-firing. The productivity and profitability of sorghum are limited by several biotic constraints, most notably anthracnose caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum. The most cost-effective and environmentally benign strategy to control anthracnose is through the incorporation of resistance genes. Over the last three years, our research efforts have been directed to identify new sources of resistance in temperate adapted and tropical germplasm, and to delimited genomic regions associated with the observe anthracnose resistant response. Three biparental mapping populations derived from the resistant lines SC112-14, QL3 and IS18760 were evaluated for anthracnose resistance response in Texas, Georgia, Florida and Puerto Rico. In parallel, three high density recombination maps were constructed and used to identify resistant loci. Anthracnose resistant response in line SC112-14 is controlled by a major locus on chromosome 5. Segregation analysis of 1,500 progenies delimited the resistance locus on chromosome 5 to a 23-kb region harboring three candidate genes, including Sobic.005G17230 identified by GWASmore » of the sorghum association panel (SAP). The latter gene belongs to a family of genes encoding F-box proteins indicating that this resistance response involved in signaling cascades and transcriptional reprograming, rather than recognition of pathotype-associated molecular patterns. In contrast, anthracnose resistant response in lines QL3 and IS18760 is controlled by multiple small-effect genes. Greenhouse evaluation of a representative subset of the three mapping populations against nine pathotypes found that lines susceptible in the field could be resistant to a single pathotype in the greenhouse. Thus, the activation of a resistance response system by a single pathotype could not provide a broader resistance response against multiple pathotypes. The screening of 1,801 sweet sorghum accessions from the National Plant Germplasm System identified 654 accessions with Brix value larger than 10, which in turn was used to select a subset of 233 accessions for evaluation of anthracnose resistant response. Even though most of the accessions were not completely infected by anthracnose, 28 accessions were completely resistant against pathotypes from Texas, Georgia, Florida and Puerto Rico. Genotyping-by-sequencing analysis of this subset identified 157,843 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Population structure analysis of the subset based on a subset of 2,345 unlinked SNPs found that the genetic diversity could be divided into four populations. The genetic relatedness among accessions within populations suggests most of the resistant germplasm may contain few different resistance sources. These resistance sources present in sweet sorghum germplasm could expedite the development of new resistant sweet sorghum cultivars and hybrids by avoiding time-consuming introgression breeding approaches with non-sweet sorghums serving as donor of the resistance alleles.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1483779
Report Number(s):
DOE-UF-14439
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0014171
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; sorghum anthracnose resistance

Citation Formats

Vermerris, Wilfred, Cuevas, Hugo, Prom, Louis, and Knoll, Joseph. Genomic dissection of anthracnose resistance response in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1483779.
Vermerris, Wilfred, Cuevas, Hugo, Prom, Louis, & Knoll, Joseph. Genomic dissection of anthracnose resistance response in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. United States. doi:10.2172/1483779.
Vermerris, Wilfred, Cuevas, Hugo, Prom, Louis, and Knoll, Joseph. Thu . "Genomic dissection of anthracnose resistance response in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]". United States. doi:10.2172/1483779. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1483779.
@article{osti_1483779,
title = {Genomic dissection of anthracnose resistance response in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]},
author = {Vermerris, Wilfred and Cuevas, Hugo and Prom, Louis and Knoll, Joseph},
abstractNote = {Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is the fifth most important grain crop behind maize, wheat, rice, and barley. Today, it is of interest as a source of fermentable sugars for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, and as a source of biomass for co-firing. The productivity and profitability of sorghum are limited by several biotic constraints, most notably anthracnose caused by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum. The most cost-effective and environmentally benign strategy to control anthracnose is through the incorporation of resistance genes. Over the last three years, our research efforts have been directed to identify new sources of resistance in temperate adapted and tropical germplasm, and to delimited genomic regions associated with the observe anthracnose resistant response. Three biparental mapping populations derived from the resistant lines SC112-14, QL3 and IS18760 were evaluated for anthracnose resistance response in Texas, Georgia, Florida and Puerto Rico. In parallel, three high density recombination maps were constructed and used to identify resistant loci. Anthracnose resistant response in line SC112-14 is controlled by a major locus on chromosome 5. Segregation analysis of 1,500 progenies delimited the resistance locus on chromosome 5 to a 23-kb region harboring three candidate genes, including Sobic.005G17230 identified by GWAS of the sorghum association panel (SAP). The latter gene belongs to a family of genes encoding F-box proteins indicating that this resistance response involved in signaling cascades and transcriptional reprograming, rather than recognition of pathotype-associated molecular patterns. In contrast, anthracnose resistant response in lines QL3 and IS18760 is controlled by multiple small-effect genes. Greenhouse evaluation of a representative subset of the three mapping populations against nine pathotypes found that lines susceptible in the field could be resistant to a single pathotype in the greenhouse. Thus, the activation of a resistance response system by a single pathotype could not provide a broader resistance response against multiple pathotypes. The screening of 1,801 sweet sorghum accessions from the National Plant Germplasm System identified 654 accessions with Brix value larger than 10, which in turn was used to select a subset of 233 accessions for evaluation of anthracnose resistant response. Even though most of the accessions were not completely infected by anthracnose, 28 accessions were completely resistant against pathotypes from Texas, Georgia, Florida and Puerto Rico. Genotyping-by-sequencing analysis of this subset identified 157,843 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Population structure analysis of the subset based on a subset of 2,345 unlinked SNPs found that the genetic diversity could be divided into four populations. The genetic relatedness among accessions within populations suggests most of the resistant germplasm may contain few different resistance sources. These resistance sources present in sweet sorghum germplasm could expedite the development of new resistant sweet sorghum cultivars and hybrids by avoiding time-consuming introgression breeding approaches with non-sweet sorghums serving as donor of the resistance alleles.},
doi = {10.2172/1483779},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}