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Title: Propagation From Deceptive News Sources Who Shares, How Much, How Evenly, and How Quickly?

Abstract

As people rely on social media as their primary sources of news, the spread of misinformation has become a significant concern. In this large-scale study of news in social media, we analyze 11 million posts and investigate the propagation behavior of users that directly interact with news accounts identified as spreading trusted versus malicious content. Unlike previous work, which looks at specific rumors, topics, or events, we consider all content propagated by various news sources. Moreover, we analyze and contrast population versus subpopulation behavior (by demographics) when spreading misinformation, and distinguish between the two types of propagation, i.e., direct retweets and mentions. Our evaluation examines how evenly, how many, how quickly, and which users propagate content from various types of news sources on Twitter. Our analysis has identified several key differences in propagation behavior from trusted versus suspicious news sources. These include high inequity in the diffusion rate based on the source of disinformation, with a small group of highly active users responsible for the majority of disinformation spread overall and within each demographic. Analysis by demographics showed that users with lower annual income and education share more from disinformation sources compared to their counterparts. News content is shared significantlymore » more quickly from trusted, conspiracy, and disinformation sources compared to clickbait and propaganda. Older users propagate news from trusted sources more quickly than younger users, but they share from suspicious sources after longer delays. Lastly, users who interact with clickbait and conspiracy sources are likely to share from propaganda accounts, but not the other way around.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1483420
Grant/Contract Number:  
286504; USC Subcontract 94725237; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems; Journal ID: ISSN 2373-7476
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; deception; disinformation; information propagation; misinformation; social network analysis

Citation Formats

Glenski, Maria, Weninger, Tim, and Volkova, Svitlana. Propagation From Deceptive News Sources Who Shares, How Much, How Evenly, and How Quickly?. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1109/TCSS.2018.2881071.
Glenski, Maria, Weninger, Tim, & Volkova, Svitlana. Propagation From Deceptive News Sources Who Shares, How Much, How Evenly, and How Quickly?. United States. doi:10.1109/TCSS.2018.2881071.
Glenski, Maria, Weninger, Tim, and Volkova, Svitlana. Wed . "Propagation From Deceptive News Sources Who Shares, How Much, How Evenly, and How Quickly?". United States. doi:10.1109/TCSS.2018.2881071.
@article{osti_1483420,
title = {Propagation From Deceptive News Sources Who Shares, How Much, How Evenly, and How Quickly?},
author = {Glenski, Maria and Weninger, Tim and Volkova, Svitlana},
abstractNote = {As people rely on social media as their primary sources of news, the spread of misinformation has become a significant concern. In this large-scale study of news in social media, we analyze 11 million posts and investigate the propagation behavior of users that directly interact with news accounts identified as spreading trusted versus malicious content. Unlike previous work, which looks at specific rumors, topics, or events, we consider all content propagated by various news sources. Moreover, we analyze and contrast population versus subpopulation behavior (by demographics) when spreading misinformation, and distinguish between the two types of propagation, i.e., direct retweets and mentions. Our evaluation examines how evenly, how many, how quickly, and which users propagate content from various types of news sources on Twitter. Our analysis has identified several key differences in propagation behavior from trusted versus suspicious news sources. These include high inequity in the diffusion rate based on the source of disinformation, with a small group of highly active users responsible for the majority of disinformation spread overall and within each demographic. Analysis by demographics showed that users with lower annual income and education share more from disinformation sources compared to their counterparts. News content is shared significantly more quickly from trusted, conspiracy, and disinformation sources compared to clickbait and propaganda. Older users propagate news from trusted sources more quickly than younger users, but they share from suspicious sources after longer delays. Lastly, users who interact with clickbait and conspiracy sources are likely to share from propaganda accounts, but not the other way around.},
doi = {10.1109/TCSS.2018.2881071},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
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