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Title: Setting the Smart Solar Standard: Collaborations Between Hawaiian Electric and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Abstract

Driving through many neighborhoods of Hawai'i, it is hard to miss the nearly ubiquitous rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that have popped up during the past eight years or so. Relatively high electricity costs associated with island grids, coupled with various incentives, have made it cost-effective to install solar over the last eight years, as evidenced by the PV-deployment chart in Figure 1. On the most populous island, O'ahu, the PV nameplate acgenerating capacity of 502 MW totals nearly half of the annual peak load for the entire island, which is 1.1 GW . Of that 502 MW of PVs, 54% is from private rooftop solar-nearly 50,000 residences or roughly one of every three single family homes. But Hawaiian Electric, the local utility, has no way to monitor or control the PV generation, even for most nonresidential systems. This means that on sunny days, up to approximately half of the PV generation is outside of the utility's control. This poses many challenges for utility planners and operators-challenges that Hawaiian Electric has been working diligently to address, along with various partners, notably the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and its Energy System's Integration Facility (ESIF).more » This article describes how Hawaiian Electric has worked with engineers in NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center to improve the way its grid operates with very high levels of distributed PVs, largely by changing the way the PV inverters are operated.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Hawaiian Electric
OSTI Identifier:
1482795
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5D00-70987
Journal ID: ISSN 1540-7977
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
IEEE Power & Energy Magazine
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1540-7977
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; distributed generation; inverters; photovoltaic systems; quasti-static time-series simulation; power hardware-in-the-loop

Citation Formats

Hoke, Andy, Giraldez, Julieta, Palmintier, Bryan, Ifuku, Earle, Asano, Marc, Ueda, Reid, and Symko-Davies, Martha. Setting the Smart Solar Standard: Collaborations Between Hawaiian Electric and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1109/MPE.2018.2864226.
Hoke, Andy, Giraldez, Julieta, Palmintier, Bryan, Ifuku, Earle, Asano, Marc, Ueda, Reid, & Symko-Davies, Martha. Setting the Smart Solar Standard: Collaborations Between Hawaiian Electric and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. United States. doi:10.1109/MPE.2018.2864226.
Hoke, Andy, Giraldez, Julieta, Palmintier, Bryan, Ifuku, Earle, Asano, Marc, Ueda, Reid, and Symko-Davies, Martha. Thu . "Setting the Smart Solar Standard: Collaborations Between Hawaiian Electric and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory". United States. doi:10.1109/MPE.2018.2864226.
@article{osti_1482795,
title = {Setting the Smart Solar Standard: Collaborations Between Hawaiian Electric and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory},
author = {Hoke, Andy and Giraldez, Julieta and Palmintier, Bryan and Ifuku, Earle and Asano, Marc and Ueda, Reid and Symko-Davies, Martha},
abstractNote = {Driving through many neighborhoods of Hawai'i, it is hard to miss the nearly ubiquitous rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that have popped up during the past eight years or so. Relatively high electricity costs associated with island grids, coupled with various incentives, have made it cost-effective to install solar over the last eight years, as evidenced by the PV-deployment chart in Figure 1. On the most populous island, O'ahu, the PV nameplate acgenerating capacity of 502 MW totals nearly half of the annual peak load for the entire island, which is 1.1 GW . Of that 502 MW of PVs, 54% is from private rooftop solar-nearly 50,000 residences or roughly one of every three single family homes. But Hawaiian Electric, the local utility, has no way to monitor or control the PV generation, even for most nonresidential systems. This means that on sunny days, up to approximately half of the PV generation is outside of the utility's control. This poses many challenges for utility planners and operators-challenges that Hawaiian Electric has been working diligently to address, along with various partners, notably the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and its Energy System's Integration Facility (ESIF). This article describes how Hawaiian Electric has worked with engineers in NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center to improve the way its grid operates with very high levels of distributed PVs, largely by changing the way the PV inverters are operated.},
doi = {10.1109/MPE.2018.2864226},
journal = {IEEE Power & Energy Magazine},
issn = {1540-7977},
number = 6,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}