skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Homologous Recombination and Transposon Propagation Shape the Population Structure of an Organism from the Deep Subsurface with Minimal Metabolism

Abstract

DPANN archaea are primarily known based on genomes from metagenomes and single cells. We reconstructed a complete population genome for Candidatus "Forterrea," a Diapherotrite with a predicted symbiotic lifestyle probably centered around nucleotide metabolism and RuBisCO. Genome-wide analysis of sequence variation provided insights into the processes that shape its population structure in the deep subsurface. The genome contains many transposons, yet reconstruction of a complete genome from a short-read insert data set was possible because most occurred only in some individuals. Accuracy of the final reconstruction could be verified because the genome displays the pattern of cumulative GC skew known for some archaea but more typically associated with bacteria. Sequence variation is highly localized, and most pronounced around transposons and relatively close to the origin of replication. Patterns of variation are best explained by homologous recombination, a process previously not described for DPANN archaea.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Earth and Planetary Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1482532
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Genome Biology and Evolution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1759-6653
Publisher:
Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; metagenomics; complete genome; archaea; DPANN; homologous recombination; transposon

Citation Formats

Probst, Alexander J., and Banfield, Jillian F. Homologous Recombination and Transposon Propagation Shape the Population Structure of an Organism from the Deep Subsurface with Minimal Metabolism. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1093/gbe/evy067.
Probst, Alexander J., & Banfield, Jillian F. Homologous Recombination and Transposon Propagation Shape the Population Structure of an Organism from the Deep Subsurface with Minimal Metabolism. United States. doi:10.1093/gbe/evy067.
Probst, Alexander J., and Banfield, Jillian F. Mon . "Homologous Recombination and Transposon Propagation Shape the Population Structure of an Organism from the Deep Subsurface with Minimal Metabolism". United States. doi:10.1093/gbe/evy067. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1482532.
@article{osti_1482532,
title = {Homologous Recombination and Transposon Propagation Shape the Population Structure of an Organism from the Deep Subsurface with Minimal Metabolism},
author = {Probst, Alexander J. and Banfield, Jillian F.},
abstractNote = {DPANN archaea are primarily known based on genomes from metagenomes and single cells. We reconstructed a complete population genome for Candidatus "Forterrea," a Diapherotrite with a predicted symbiotic lifestyle probably centered around nucleotide metabolism and RuBisCO. Genome-wide analysis of sequence variation provided insights into the processes that shape its population structure in the deep subsurface. The genome contains many transposons, yet reconstruction of a complete genome from a short-read insert data set was possible because most occurred only in some individuals. Accuracy of the final reconstruction could be verified because the genome displays the pattern of cumulative GC skew known for some archaea but more typically associated with bacteria. Sequence variation is highly localized, and most pronounced around transposons and relatively close to the origin of replication. Patterns of variation are best explained by homologous recombination, a process previously not described for DPANN archaea.},
doi = {10.1093/gbe/evy067},
journal = {Genome Biology and Evolution},
issn = {1759-6653},
number = 4,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: