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Title: Final Technical Report

Abstract

Lignocellulosic biomass is poised to become a significant source of renewable fuel in the United States, and perennial grasses such as switchgrass are likely to provide a significant amount of this biomass. A decline in biomass yield is typically observed in switchgrass immediately following completion of flowering. In the northern part of the country, flowering occurs in switchgrass around the time that biomass yield peaks, and the approximately two-month growing season for biomass accumulation can be lost due to a flowering event. If flowering time can be delayed about 4-5 weeks, biomass yield can potentially increase 30-50%. To develop a rational strategy for creating improved switchgrass with late flowering, it would be beneficial to have a better understanding of the genes that control flowering time in switchgrass. The proposed research aims to dissect the genetic control of the flowering time of switchgrass. Through genetic, genomic, and bioinformatics approaches, key genes involved in the flowering pathways such as photoperiod and circadian control have been identified. The obtained research information will help further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying anthesis phenotypes of switchgrass. The genetic variants related to floral development identified through the project can support a long-term goal of developing late floweringmore » varieties of switchgrass that fully utilize the growing season and achieve high biomass yield. The resources generated from the project have been timely distributed to the community via professional meetings and publications. Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers have been trained through working on the project.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  2. USDA-ARS
  3. Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)
  4. DNASTAR Inc.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yiwei Jiang/Purdue University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research
OSTI Identifier:
1482494
Report Number(s):
DOE-Purdue-0010631
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010631
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Peer-reviewed article for the project: Taylor, M., C-E. Tornqvist, X. Zhao, P. Grabowski, R. Doerge, J. Ma, J. Volenec, J. Evans, G. P. Ramstein, M.D. Sanciangco, C. R. Buell, M.D. Casler, and Y. Jiang*. 2018. Genome-wide association study in pseudo-F2 populations of switchgrass identifies genetic loci affecting heading and anthesis dates. Frontiers in Plant Science 9:1250. DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2018.01250. Tornqvist, C-E., M. Taylor, Y. Jiang, J. Evans, C. R. Buell, S. M. Kaeppler, and M.D. Casler*. 2018. Quantitative trait locus mapping for flowering time in a lowland x upland switchgrass pseudo-F2 population. The Plant Genome 11, 1700932. DOI: 10.3835/plantgenome2017.10.0093. Grabowski, P, J. Evans, C. Daum, S. Deshpande, K. Barry, M. Kennedy, G. Ramstein, S. Kaeppler, R. Buell, Y. Jiang, and M. Casler*. 2017. Genome-wide associations with flowering time in switchgrass using exome-capture sequencing data. New Phytologist 213: 154–169. DOI: 10.1111/nph.14101. Taylor, M., X. Zhao, M.D. Casler, and Y. Jiang*. Transcriptome profiling reveals differentially expressed genes associated with flowering time in contrasting switchgrass genotypes. Plant Cell Reports (under review).
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Flowering time, Genes, Switchgrass

Citation Formats

Jiang, Yiwei, Casler, Michael, Taylor, Megan, Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Grabowski, Paul, Buell, Robin, Evans, Joseph, Ramstein, Guillaume, Zhao, Xiongwei, Ma, Jianxin, Volenec, Jeffrey, Doerge, Rebecca, Sanciangco, Millicent, Kaeppler, Shawn, Daum, Chris, Deshpande, Shweta, Barry, Kerrie, and Kennedy, Megan. Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1482494.
Jiang, Yiwei, Casler, Michael, Taylor, Megan, Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Grabowski, Paul, Buell, Robin, Evans, Joseph, Ramstein, Guillaume, Zhao, Xiongwei, Ma, Jianxin, Volenec, Jeffrey, Doerge, Rebecca, Sanciangco, Millicent, Kaeppler, Shawn, Daum, Chris, Deshpande, Shweta, Barry, Kerrie, & Kennedy, Megan. Final Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1482494.
Jiang, Yiwei, Casler, Michael, Taylor, Megan, Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Grabowski, Paul, Buell, Robin, Evans, Joseph, Ramstein, Guillaume, Zhao, Xiongwei, Ma, Jianxin, Volenec, Jeffrey, Doerge, Rebecca, Sanciangco, Millicent, Kaeppler, Shawn, Daum, Chris, Deshpande, Shweta, Barry, Kerrie, and Kennedy, Megan. Sun . "Final Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1482494. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1482494.
@article{osti_1482494,
title = {Final Technical Report},
author = {Jiang, Yiwei and Casler, Michael and Taylor, Megan and Tornqvist, Carl-Erik and Grabowski, Paul and Buell, Robin and Evans, Joseph and Ramstein, Guillaume and Zhao, Xiongwei and Ma, Jianxin and Volenec, Jeffrey and Doerge, Rebecca and Sanciangco, Millicent and Kaeppler, Shawn and Daum, Chris and Deshpande, Shweta and Barry, Kerrie and Kennedy, Megan},
abstractNote = {Lignocellulosic biomass is poised to become a significant source of renewable fuel in the United States, and perennial grasses such as switchgrass are likely to provide a significant amount of this biomass. A decline in biomass yield is typically observed in switchgrass immediately following completion of flowering. In the northern part of the country, flowering occurs in switchgrass around the time that biomass yield peaks, and the approximately two-month growing season for biomass accumulation can be lost due to a flowering event. If flowering time can be delayed about 4-5 weeks, biomass yield can potentially increase 30-50%. To develop a rational strategy for creating improved switchgrass with late flowering, it would be beneficial to have a better understanding of the genes that control flowering time in switchgrass. The proposed research aims to dissect the genetic control of the flowering time of switchgrass. Through genetic, genomic, and bioinformatics approaches, key genes involved in the flowering pathways such as photoperiod and circadian control have been identified. The obtained research information will help further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying anthesis phenotypes of switchgrass. The genetic variants related to floral development identified through the project can support a long-term goal of developing late flowering varieties of switchgrass that fully utilize the growing season and achieve high biomass yield. The resources generated from the project have been timely distributed to the community via professional meetings and publications. Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers have been trained through working on the project.},
doi = {10.2172/1482494},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}