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Title: Nanotube/Nanowire as Effective Defect Sinks in Metals—Atomistic Simulations and In Situ Ion Radiation Transmission Electron Microscopy

Abstract

The accumulation of defects during irradiation leads to material property degradation modes such as embrittlement and swelling, eventually causing material failure. Effective and efficient removal of defects is of crucial importance to design radiation damage-tolerant materials. Here, by biasing defect migration pathways via carbon nanotube (CNT) infiltration, we present a greatly enhanced damage-tolerant Al-CNT composite with defect storage measured to be one order of magnitude lower than that in pure, irradiated Al. Furthermore, extreme-value statistics (largest size) of defect clusters are significantly changed in the presence of CNT. In situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments and atomistic simulations together reveal the dynamic evolution and convergent diffusion of radiation-induced defects to CNTs, facilitating defect recombination and enhancing radiation tolerance. The occurrence of CNT-biased defect convergent migration is tuned by the thermodynamic driving force of stress gradient in Al matrix due to the CNT phase transformation. This approach to controlling defect migration using 1D interface engineering creates a new opportunity to enhance the properties of nuclear materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [6];  [1];  [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  2. Sungkyunkwan University
  3. Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics
  4. Argonne National Laboratory
  5. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  6. Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1481900
DOE Contract Number:  
NE0008827
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Materials Research Society , Boston, November 25-30, 2018
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

So, Kangpyo, Cao, Penghui, Yang, Yang, Park, Jong Gil, Li, Mingda, Long, Yan, Hu, Jing, Kirk, Mark, Li, Meimei, Lee, Young Hee, Short, Michael, and Li, Ju. Nanotube/Nanowire as Effective Defect Sinks in Metals—Atomistic Simulations and In Situ Ion Radiation Transmission Electron Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
So, Kangpyo, Cao, Penghui, Yang, Yang, Park, Jong Gil, Li, Mingda, Long, Yan, Hu, Jing, Kirk, Mark, Li, Meimei, Lee, Young Hee, Short, Michael, & Li, Ju. Nanotube/Nanowire as Effective Defect Sinks in Metals—Atomistic Simulations and In Situ Ion Radiation Transmission Electron Microscopy. United States.
So, Kangpyo, Cao, Penghui, Yang, Yang, Park, Jong Gil, Li, Mingda, Long, Yan, Hu, Jing, Kirk, Mark, Li, Meimei, Lee, Young Hee, Short, Michael, and Li, Ju. Thu . "Nanotube/Nanowire as Effective Defect Sinks in Metals—Atomistic Simulations and In Situ Ion Radiation Transmission Electron Microscopy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1481900.
@article{osti_1481900,
title = {Nanotube/Nanowire as Effective Defect Sinks in Metals—Atomistic Simulations and In Situ Ion Radiation Transmission Electron Microscopy},
author = {So, Kangpyo and Cao, Penghui and Yang, Yang and Park, Jong Gil and Li, Mingda and Long, Yan and Hu, Jing and Kirk, Mark and Li, Meimei and Lee, Young Hee and Short, Michael and Li, Ju},
abstractNote = {The accumulation of defects during irradiation leads to material property degradation modes such as embrittlement and swelling, eventually causing material failure. Effective and efficient removal of defects is of crucial importance to design radiation damage-tolerant materials. Here, by biasing defect migration pathways via carbon nanotube (CNT) infiltration, we present a greatly enhanced damage-tolerant Al-CNT composite with defect storage measured to be one order of magnitude lower than that in pure, irradiated Al. Furthermore, extreme-value statistics (largest size) of defect clusters are significantly changed in the presence of CNT. In situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments and atomistic simulations together reveal the dynamic evolution and convergent diffusion of radiation-induced defects to CNTs, facilitating defect recombination and enhancing radiation tolerance. The occurrence of CNT-biased defect convergent migration is tuned by the thermodynamic driving force of stress gradient in Al matrix due to the CNT phase transformation. This approach to controlling defect migration using 1D interface engineering creates a new opportunity to enhance the properties of nuclear materials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 29 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Nov 29 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

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