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Title: Electroelastic investigation of drying rate in the direct contact ultrasonic fabric dewatering process

Abstract

Ultrasonic vibrations, used to atomize liquids into a fine mist, are a promising solution for the future of efficient clothes drying technology. The world’s first ultrasonic dryer—demonstrated by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—successfully applies the scientific principles behind ultrasonic drying, and several working prototypes have been demonstrated. This technology is based on direct mechanical coupling between mesh piezoelectric transducers and wet fabric. During the atomization process, vertical oscillations of a contained liquid, called Faraday excitations, result in the formation of standing waves on the liquid surface. At increasing amplitudes and frequencies of oscillation, wave peaks become extended and form “necks” connecting small secondary droplets to the bulk liquid. When the oscillation reaches an acceleration threshold, the droplet momentum is sufficient to break the surface tension of the neck and enable the droplets to travel away from the liquid. In this work, we investigate the atomization process using an ultrasonic transducer as it pertains to moisture retained within a fabric. An experimentally validated electromechanical analytical-numerical model is proposed. This model bridges the vibrations of a piezoelectric mesh transducer to the critical acceleration needed for fabric drying to occur. Then, the drying rate model is developed, consisting of an initial nonlinearmore » region due to atomization, followed by a linear thermal evaporation region. The models developed identify the influence of key parameters on ultrasonic drying and will aid in improving atomizer design for efficient, timely fabric drying. This study is the first proposed model for the ultrasonic atomization of fabrics saturated with water, applicable to any type of transducer. The results present a non-dimensional equation for the ultrasonic dewatering of fabrics, dependent only on transducer acceleration and the surface area of the cloth. Furthermore, the development of this technology using the proposed physical models will allow for global reductions in electrical demand related to clothes drying.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1481701
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 235; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Ultrasonic drying; Atomization; Piezoelectric transducer; Vibration analysis

Citation Formats

Dupuis, Eric D., Momen, Ayyoub Mehdizadeh, Patel, Viral K., and Shahab, Shima. Electroelastic investigation of drying rate in the direct contact ultrasonic fabric dewatering process. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.10.100.
Dupuis, Eric D., Momen, Ayyoub Mehdizadeh, Patel, Viral K., & Shahab, Shima. Electroelastic investigation of drying rate in the direct contact ultrasonic fabric dewatering process. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.10.100.
Dupuis, Eric D., Momen, Ayyoub Mehdizadeh, Patel, Viral K., and Shahab, Shima. Tue . "Electroelastic investigation of drying rate in the direct contact ultrasonic fabric dewatering process". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.10.100.
@article{osti_1481701,
title = {Electroelastic investigation of drying rate in the direct contact ultrasonic fabric dewatering process},
author = {Dupuis, Eric D. and Momen, Ayyoub Mehdizadeh and Patel, Viral K. and Shahab, Shima},
abstractNote = {Ultrasonic vibrations, used to atomize liquids into a fine mist, are a promising solution for the future of efficient clothes drying technology. The world’s first ultrasonic dryer—demonstrated by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—successfully applies the scientific principles behind ultrasonic drying, and several working prototypes have been demonstrated. This technology is based on direct mechanical coupling between mesh piezoelectric transducers and wet fabric. During the atomization process, vertical oscillations of a contained liquid, called Faraday excitations, result in the formation of standing waves on the liquid surface. At increasing amplitudes and frequencies of oscillation, wave peaks become extended and form “necks” connecting small secondary droplets to the bulk liquid. When the oscillation reaches an acceleration threshold, the droplet momentum is sufficient to break the surface tension of the neck and enable the droplets to travel away from the liquid. In this work, we investigate the atomization process using an ultrasonic transducer as it pertains to moisture retained within a fabric. An experimentally validated electromechanical analytical-numerical model is proposed. This model bridges the vibrations of a piezoelectric mesh transducer to the critical acceleration needed for fabric drying to occur. Then, the drying rate model is developed, consisting of an initial nonlinear region due to atomization, followed by a linear thermal evaporation region. The models developed identify the influence of key parameters on ultrasonic drying and will aid in improving atomizer design for efficient, timely fabric drying. This study is the first proposed model for the ultrasonic atomization of fabrics saturated with water, applicable to any type of transducer. The results present a non-dimensional equation for the ultrasonic dewatering of fabrics, dependent only on transducer acceleration and the surface area of the cloth. Furthermore, the development of this technology using the proposed physical models will allow for global reductions in electrical demand related to clothes drying.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.10.100},
journal = {Applied Energy},
issn = {0306-2619},
number = C,
volume = 235,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
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