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Title: FY18 Status Report: SNL Research into Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters

Abstract

This progress report describes work done in FY18 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The work focuses on stress corrosion cracking (SCC), the only mechanism by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY18 continued several studies initiated in FY17 that are aimed at refining the understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluating the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL canister environment work focused on evaluating the stability of sea-salt deliquescent brines on the heated canister surface; an additional opportunity to analyze dusts sampled from an inservice spent nuclear fuel storage canister also arose. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments. The scope of these efforts targets near-marine Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation environments whichmore » are generally considered to be most aggressive for pitting and SCC. Work to define the chemical and physical environment that could develop on storage canister surfaces in near-marine environments included experiments to evaluate the thermal stability of magnesium chloride brines, representative of the first brines to form when sea-salts deliquesce, with the specific goal of understanding and interpreting results of sea-salt and magnesium chloride corrosion experiments carried out under accelerated conditions. The experiments showed that magnesium chloride brines, and by extension, low RH sea-salt deliquescent brines, are not stable at elevated temperatures, losing chloride via degassing of HC1 and conversion to Mg-hydroxychlorides and carbonates. The experiments were carried out on an inert substrate to eliminate the effects of corrosion reactions, simulating brine stabilities in the absence of, or prior to, corrosion. Moreover, analysis of salts recovered from actively corroding metal samples shows that corrosion also supports or drives conversion of magnesium chloride or sea-salt brines to less deliquescent salts. This process has significant implications on corrosion, as the secondary phases are less deliquescent than magnesium chloride; the conversion reaction results in decreases in brine volume, and potentially results in brine dry-out. The deliquescence properties of these reaction products will be a topic of active research in FY19.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1481507
Report Number(s):
SAND-2018-12595R
668754
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bryan, Charles R., and Schindelholz, Eric John. FY18 Status Report: SNL Research into Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1481507.
Bryan, Charles R., & Schindelholz, Eric John. FY18 Status Report: SNL Research into Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters. United States. doi:10.2172/1481507.
Bryan, Charles R., and Schindelholz, Eric John. Thu . "FY18 Status Report: SNL Research into Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters". United States. doi:10.2172/1481507. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1481507.
@article{osti_1481507,
title = {FY18 Status Report: SNL Research into Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters},
author = {Bryan, Charles R. and Schindelholz, Eric John},
abstractNote = {This progress report describes work done in FY18 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The work focuses on stress corrosion cracking (SCC), the only mechanism by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY18 continued several studies initiated in FY17 that are aimed at refining the understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluating the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL canister environment work focused on evaluating the stability of sea-salt deliquescent brines on the heated canister surface; an additional opportunity to analyze dusts sampled from an inservice spent nuclear fuel storage canister also arose. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments. The scope of these efforts targets near-marine Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation environments which are generally considered to be most aggressive for pitting and SCC. Work to define the chemical and physical environment that could develop on storage canister surfaces in near-marine environments included experiments to evaluate the thermal stability of magnesium chloride brines, representative of the first brines to form when sea-salts deliquesce, with the specific goal of understanding and interpreting results of sea-salt and magnesium chloride corrosion experiments carried out under accelerated conditions. The experiments showed that magnesium chloride brines, and by extension, low RH sea-salt deliquescent brines, are not stable at elevated temperatures, losing chloride via degassing of HC1 and conversion to Mg-hydroxychlorides and carbonates. The experiments were carried out on an inert substrate to eliminate the effects of corrosion reactions, simulating brine stabilities in the absence of, or prior to, corrosion. Moreover, analysis of salts recovered from actively corroding metal samples shows that corrosion also supports or drives conversion of magnesium chloride or sea-salt brines to less deliquescent salts. This process has significant implications on corrosion, as the secondary phases are less deliquescent than magnesium chloride; the conversion reaction results in decreases in brine volume, and potentially results in brine dry-out. The deliquescence properties of these reaction products will be a topic of active research in FY19.},
doi = {10.2172/1481507},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}