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Title: Stereolithographic Fabrication of a Flow Cell For Improved Neurochemical Sensor Testing

Abstract

The human brain remains a mystery to researchers. Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed highly sensitive and flexible multimodal multielectrode arrays (MEAs) with the potential to be both powerful diagnostic and therapeutic tools when dealing with neurological ailments such as Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Traumatic Brain Injuries. These MEAs include biosensors in addition to electrodes for electrical stimulation and recording. The transition from the traditional rigid neural probes to the flexible MEAs has led LLNL researchers on the search for alternative testing and characterization methods for flexible devices in vitro. The rigid devices have been shown to be more abrasive and damaging to the brain when implanted, but due to their rigidity – are more robust and resilient to noise artifacts in in vitro testing. The flexible MEAs, similar in size and flexibility to a human hair, cause much less damage in the brain but have had a difficult time maintaining their integrity and collecting data without high-levels of noise due to the formation of inertial eddies (due to increased turbulent flow) moving the flexible MEA during in vitro testing. The goal of this project was to design a fluidic cell to allow formore » a more constant electrochemical testing & characterization of biosensors on these flexible MEAs. Design and fabrication of the fluidic cell was through the use of CAD software and a stereolithography printer using clear photopolymer resin (appropriate for biomedical use and quality resolution). Flow cells facilitate analyte delivery to biosensor surfaces in a more constant and controlled fashion, allowing for –in this case –a better electrodeposition of thin-film Platinum-Iridium (Pt-Ir) on MEAs of 16 Platinum disc electrodes 50µm in diameter. Platinum-Iridium alloy electrodes have been widely used in biomedical and industrial applications. Iridium adds mechanical stiffness to platinum. PtIr is a FDA approved electrode material for human implantable devices.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1481062
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-756279
943688
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Materials science, Chemistry - Inorganic, organic, physical and analytical chemistry, Engineering - Other instrumentation

Citation Formats

Hosseini, Neda. Stereolithographic Fabrication of a Flow Cell For Improved Neurochemical Sensor Testing. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1481062.
Hosseini, Neda. Stereolithographic Fabrication of a Flow Cell For Improved Neurochemical Sensor Testing. United States. doi:10.2172/1481062.
Hosseini, Neda. Tue . "Stereolithographic Fabrication of a Flow Cell For Improved Neurochemical Sensor Testing". United States. doi:10.2172/1481062. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1481062.
@article{osti_1481062,
title = {Stereolithographic Fabrication of a Flow Cell For Improved Neurochemical Sensor Testing},
author = {Hosseini, Neda},
abstractNote = {The human brain remains a mystery to researchers. Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed highly sensitive and flexible multimodal multielectrode arrays (MEAs) with the potential to be both powerful diagnostic and therapeutic tools when dealing with neurological ailments such as Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Traumatic Brain Injuries. These MEAs include biosensors in addition to electrodes for electrical stimulation and recording. The transition from the traditional rigid neural probes to the flexible MEAs has led LLNL researchers on the search for alternative testing and characterization methods for flexible devices in vitro. The rigid devices have been shown to be more abrasive and damaging to the brain when implanted, but due to their rigidity – are more robust and resilient to noise artifacts in in vitro testing. The flexible MEAs, similar in size and flexibility to a human hair, cause much less damage in the brain but have had a difficult time maintaining their integrity and collecting data without high-levels of noise due to the formation of inertial eddies (due to increased turbulent flow) moving the flexible MEA during in vitro testing. The goal of this project was to design a fluidic cell to allow for a more constant electrochemical testing & characterization of biosensors on these flexible MEAs. Design and fabrication of the fluidic cell was through the use of CAD software and a stereolithography printer using clear photopolymer resin (appropriate for biomedical use and quality resolution). Flow cells facilitate analyte delivery to biosensor surfaces in a more constant and controlled fashion, allowing for –in this case –a better electrodeposition of thin-film Platinum-Iridium (Pt-Ir) on MEAs of 16 Platinum disc electrodes 50µm in diameter. Platinum-Iridium alloy electrodes have been widely used in biomedical and industrial applications. Iridium adds mechanical stiffness to platinum. PtIr is a FDA approved electrode material for human implantable devices.},
doi = {10.2172/1481062},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}