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Title: NSLS-II: Turn-by-Turn BPM Data Analysis – A Use Case Approach

Abstract

A modern ring-based light source is a complex dynamic system for which the design is guided by a realistic computer model with predictable results. State-of-the-arts beam requirements translate into tight engineering tolerances. So, quality assurance for the equipment, e.g. ring magnets, girder system, power supplies, RF system, etc. is crucial to deliver on the design goals for the beam quality. For a streamlined commissioning and an effective approach for integration of insertion devices, the latter being an activity that is typically on-going for the entire life cycle of the facility, it is equally important to be able to calibrate the beam dynamics design model against the real system and pursue e.g. “gap analysis”, linear and nonlinear optics corrections, improvements to the baseline design, etc. In particular, for high-end insertion devices. Conceptually, it can be thought of as pursuing Model-Based and Adaptive Control; instead of “flying blind”. A straightforward approach is to use a pinger, a ~30 cm long hor/ver kicker that can kick the beam to about 1 mrad in each plane [1-2] and a Turn-by-Turn BPM data acquisition system that records the betatron motion on a Turn-by-Turn basis. Examples include: ALS, SLS, DIAMOND, and SOLEIL. We first outline howmore » to measure the Beam Impulse Response (BIR) function and related Beam Transfer Function (BTF) with a Turn-by-Turn BPM data acquisition system and a pinger. In particular, how to obtain the amplitude and phase of the spectral components in the betatron spectrum with high precision by using signal processing. We also quantify how the impact of noise affects the accuracy of the measurements.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1480956
Report Number(s):
NSLSII-ASD-TN-125; BNL-209410-2018-TECH
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Hidaka, Yoshiteru. NSLS-II: Turn-by-Turn BPM Data Analysis – A Use Case Approach. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1480956.
Hidaka, Yoshiteru. NSLS-II: Turn-by-Turn BPM Data Analysis – A Use Case Approach. United States. doi:10.2172/1480956.
Hidaka, Yoshiteru. Tue . "NSLS-II: Turn-by-Turn BPM Data Analysis – A Use Case Approach". United States. doi:10.2172/1480956. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1480956.
@article{osti_1480956,
title = {NSLS-II: Turn-by-Turn BPM Data Analysis – A Use Case Approach},
author = {Hidaka, Yoshiteru},
abstractNote = {A modern ring-based light source is a complex dynamic system for which the design is guided by a realistic computer model with predictable results. State-of-the-arts beam requirements translate into tight engineering tolerances. So, quality assurance for the equipment, e.g. ring magnets, girder system, power supplies, RF system, etc. is crucial to deliver on the design goals for the beam quality. For a streamlined commissioning and an effective approach for integration of insertion devices, the latter being an activity that is typically on-going for the entire life cycle of the facility, it is equally important to be able to calibrate the beam dynamics design model against the real system and pursue e.g. “gap analysis”, linear and nonlinear optics corrections, improvements to the baseline design, etc. In particular, for high-end insertion devices. Conceptually, it can be thought of as pursuing Model-Based and Adaptive Control; instead of “flying blind”. A straightforward approach is to use a pinger, a ~30 cm long hor/ver kicker that can kick the beam to about 1 mrad in each plane [1-2] and a Turn-by-Turn BPM data acquisition system that records the betatron motion on a Turn-by-Turn basis. Examples include: ALS, SLS, DIAMOND, and SOLEIL. We first outline how to measure the Beam Impulse Response (BIR) function and related Beam Transfer Function (BTF) with a Turn-by-Turn BPM data acquisition system and a pinger. In particular, how to obtain the amplitude and phase of the spectral components in the betatron spectrum with high precision by using signal processing. We also quantify how the impact of noise affects the accuracy of the measurements.},
doi = {10.2172/1480956},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}