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Title: Confronting Models with Regional CO 2 Observations

Abstract

This research addressed an important DOE science area: the role of natural disturbances in carbon cycling. Our project included both (a) modeling and field measurements and (b) strengthened ties between DOE national laboratories and universities which continue after the project was completed. Our focus was on understanding the consequences of drought and emissions (fire and urban) to atmospheric trace gas composition (carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane), including both concentration and stable isotope composition. Measurements of these atmospheric gases were used to infer the spatial and temporal patterns of both sources and sinks in the carbon cycle. As part of this effort, we maintained two long-term monitoring networks along a geographic gradient in Utah and Colorado that spans montane forests, urban regions, and oil/gas fields. In this research, we expanded on a well-accepted atmospheric model (STILT-WRF) as a tool to evaluate fluxes in CLM/CESM-related models. We used the STILT model to provide a strong linkage between point atmospheric measurements and the surface parameterizations/emissions that are part of the CLM/CESM models. Overall, this project benefited and supported the DOE Long Term Mission and Goals in four distinct ways: (a) testing of carbon cycle models, (b) testing and evaluating model mechanisms wherebymore » factors in CLM influence trace gas composition in CESM, (c) acquiring high-quality, long-term data on concentrations of carbon dioxide in western USA ecosystems, and (d) by reducing uncertainties associated with the representation of climate-carbon feedbacks in Earth System models through the development of new methods for evaluating model performance. One postdoctoral associate (Henrique Duarte) and one Ph.D. student (Darek Malia) were trained with this support. Nine peer-reviewed publications and 14 poster presentations were produced with support from this project. This proposal addresses a specific science area in the RFP: the role of natural disturbances in carbon cycling. In particular, we will focus on the consequences of drought and fire at landscape to regional scales for atmospheric trace gas concentration and stable isotope composition (CO 2, CO, and CH 4). We seek to expand on the well accepted atmospheric Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as a tool to evaluate stable isotope fluxes in CLM/CESM-related models through existing, long-term data sets and field campaigns where high-precision trace gas concentration and isotope measurements can be made along gradients and transects. Given the confounding impacts of anthropogenic trace gas emissions on landscape-to-regional atmospheric observations, we will also measure and parameterize isotopic characteristics of CO 2, CO, and CH 4 from anthropogenic or forest sources in order to allow us the opportunity to partition atmospheric trace gases into natural and anthropogenic sources.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). School of Biological Sciences
  2. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1480332
Report Number(s):
FinalReportUtah-181101
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010624
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; carbon cycle; models; carbon flux; carbon isotope; carbon dioxide

Citation Formats

Ehleringer, James, and Lin, John. Confronting Models with Regional CO2 Observations. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1480332.
Ehleringer, James, & Lin, John. Confronting Models with Regional CO2 Observations. United States. doi:10.2172/1480332.
Ehleringer, James, and Lin, John. Thu . "Confronting Models with Regional CO2 Observations". United States. doi:10.2172/1480332. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1480332.
@article{osti_1480332,
title = {Confronting Models with Regional CO2 Observations},
author = {Ehleringer, James and Lin, John},
abstractNote = {This research addressed an important DOE science area: the role of natural disturbances in carbon cycling. Our project included both (a) modeling and field measurements and (b) strengthened ties between DOE national laboratories and universities which continue after the project was completed. Our focus was on understanding the consequences of drought and emissions (fire and urban) to atmospheric trace gas composition (carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane), including both concentration and stable isotope composition. Measurements of these atmospheric gases were used to infer the spatial and temporal patterns of both sources and sinks in the carbon cycle. As part of this effort, we maintained two long-term monitoring networks along a geographic gradient in Utah and Colorado that spans montane forests, urban regions, and oil/gas fields. In this research, we expanded on a well-accepted atmospheric model (STILT-WRF) as a tool to evaluate fluxes in CLM/CESM-related models. We used the STILT model to provide a strong linkage between point atmospheric measurements and the surface parameterizations/emissions that are part of the CLM/CESM models. Overall, this project benefited and supported the DOE Long Term Mission and Goals in four distinct ways: (a) testing of carbon cycle models, (b) testing and evaluating model mechanisms whereby factors in CLM influence trace gas composition in CESM, (c) acquiring high-quality, long-term data on concentrations of carbon dioxide in western USA ecosystems, and (d) by reducing uncertainties associated with the representation of climate-carbon feedbacks in Earth System models through the development of new methods for evaluating model performance. One postdoctoral associate (Henrique Duarte) and one Ph.D. student (Darek Malia) were trained with this support. Nine peer-reviewed publications and 14 poster presentations were produced with support from this project. This proposal addresses a specific science area in the RFP: the role of natural disturbances in carbon cycling. In particular, we will focus on the consequences of drought and fire at landscape to regional scales for atmospheric trace gas concentration and stable isotope composition (CO2, CO, and CH4). We seek to expand on the well accepted atmospheric Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as a tool to evaluate stable isotope fluxes in CLM/CESM-related models through existing, long-term data sets and field campaigns where high-precision trace gas concentration and isotope measurements can be made along gradients and transects. Given the confounding impacts of anthropogenic trace gas emissions on landscape-to-regional atmospheric observations, we will also measure and parameterize isotopic characteristics of CO2, CO, and CH4 from anthropogenic or forest sources in order to allow us the opportunity to partition atmospheric trace gases into natural and anthropogenic sources.},
doi = {10.2172/1480332},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}