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Title: Functional Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Use in Fusion Energy Systems

Abstract

There is growing demand for new, cleaner ways to supply the rapidly growing global energy demand, as concerns grow over climate change and declining supplies of fossil fuels. Nuclear fusion, the phenomenon in which atomic nuclei collide together and release massive quantities of energy, is one of the most promising options for generating large amounts of carbon-free energy in the future.1 To initiate a common nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes – deuterium and tritium, a hot plasma state is needed at incredibly high temperatures approaching 100 million degrees centigrade. One practical way to achieve these conditions is to use magnetic confinement of the plasma in a toroidal nuclear reactor known as a tokamak (Figure 1). A commercial fusion power station will then harvest the energy by converting the heat provided by the fusion chain reaction into steam to power gas turbines, and generate electricity on to the grid, while the excess neutrons also produced in the process is captured by a blanket made of dense material surrounding the tokomak.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Solution Spray Technologies, LLC, Storrs Mansfield, CT (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Solution Spray Technologies, LLC, Storrs Mansfield, CT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1480077
Report Number(s):
SST-DOE-FUSION1-P1F
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0015820
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; nuclear reactor; protective coating

Citation Formats

Jiang, Chen, Gell, Maurice, Jordan, Eric, Roth, Jeffrey, and Pint, Bruce. Functional Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Use in Fusion Energy Systems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Jiang, Chen, Gell, Maurice, Jordan, Eric, Roth, Jeffrey, & Pint, Bruce. Functional Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Use in Fusion Energy Systems. United States.
Jiang, Chen, Gell, Maurice, Jordan, Eric, Roth, Jeffrey, and Pint, Bruce. Wed . "Functional Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Use in Fusion Energy Systems". United States.
@article{osti_1480077,
title = {Functional Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Use in Fusion Energy Systems},
author = {Jiang, Chen and Gell, Maurice and Jordan, Eric and Roth, Jeffrey and Pint, Bruce},
abstractNote = {There is growing demand for new, cleaner ways to supply the rapidly growing global energy demand, as concerns grow over climate change and declining supplies of fossil fuels. Nuclear fusion, the phenomenon in which atomic nuclei collide together and release massive quantities of energy, is one of the most promising options for generating large amounts of carbon-free energy in the future.1 To initiate a common nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes – deuterium and tritium, a hot plasma state is needed at incredibly high temperatures approaching 100 million degrees centigrade. One practical way to achieve these conditions is to use magnetic confinement of the plasma in a toroidal nuclear reactor known as a tokamak (Figure 1). A commercial fusion power station will then harvest the energy by converting the heat provided by the fusion chain reaction into steam to power gas turbines, and generate electricity on to the grid, while the excess neutrons also produced in the process is captured by a blanket made of dense material surrounding the tokomak.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as October 31, 2022
Other availability
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