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Title: Experience in automating the Title V permit application

Abstract

Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires that the owners and operators of certain types of industrial plants obtain a federal operating permit. In general, any plant that meets the definition of a major source must either obtain a Title V Operating permit, or take actions to ``act out`` of the Title V program. This Technical Paper describes the experience of the authors in designing and implementing a computer system for data management and reporting of Clean Air Act Title V Permit information. Recommendations are also provided to guide companies and industry groups who are planning to undertake similar automation projects.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Warren Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)
  2. Process Data Control Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
147992
Report Number(s):
CONF-950152-
TRN: IM9601%%97
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Petro-Safe `95 conference and exhibition, Houston, TX (United States), 31 Jan - 2 Feb 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Petro-safe `95: 6. Annual environmental, safety and health conference and exhibition for the oil, gas and petrochemical industries. Book 1; PB: 590 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; PERMIT APPLICATIONS; AUTOMATION; PERMITS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; COMPLIANCE; CLEAN AIR ACTS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Ashcraft, T., and O`Brien, J. Experience in automating the Title V permit application. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Ashcraft, T., & O`Brien, J. Experience in automating the Title V permit application. United States.
Ashcraft, T., and O`Brien, J. Sun . "Experience in automating the Title V permit application". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_147992,
title = {Experience in automating the Title V permit application},
author = {Ashcraft, T. and O`Brien, J.},
abstractNote = {Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires that the owners and operators of certain types of industrial plants obtain a federal operating permit. In general, any plant that meets the definition of a major source must either obtain a Title V Operating permit, or take actions to ``act out`` of the Title V program. This Technical Paper describes the experience of the authors in designing and implementing a computer system for data management and reporting of Clean Air Act Title V Permit information. Recommendations are also provided to guide companies and industry groups who are planning to undertake similar automation projects.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required the USEPA to establish a comprehensive operating permit program which is being administered by the states. Most major air pollution sources will be required to submit operating permit applications by November 15, 1995 or earlier. Portland cement plants that burn waste-derived fuel face some special permitting problems that need to be addressed during the permit application process. This paper presents a brief summary of the Title V application with special emphasis on the permitting requirements incurred by the utilization of waste fuel at cement plants.
  • The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 instituted major changes in the way that air emission sources are regulated and permitted. Along with being a major research and development laboratory owned by the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is also classified as a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in the Chicago metropolitan area which has been designated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as severe (17) for ozone. As a major source ANL is therefore required under Title V of CAAA to apply for a federally enforceable permit for all sources ofmore » air emissions at the facility. While the ANL Boiler House represents the most significant emission source at the Laboratory, there are, nevertheless, a large number of other emission sources, some of which are currently permitted by the State of Illinois and others of which are exempt from state permitting requirements. A large number of R & D related sources are of relatively small magnitude. The ability to identify, inventory, characterize and classify all sources under the various titles of CAAA constitutes a major challenge for R & D laboratories of this size.« less
  • Now that some state regulatory agencies are reviewing Title V permit applications and issuing permits, evaluation of the process can be made in comparison with the original goals of the Title V permitting program. In addition, assessment of the terms and conditions that are being incorporated into permits, the nature of draft permits that are issued to facilities for comment, and the extent and type of negotiation that have been conducted with agencies to develop successful Title V permits, will be helpful for facilities that are currently undergoing application review. In working with a Fortune 500 surface coating company, fourteenmore » Title V permit applications were developed and submitted for plants located in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Illinois, Georgia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Indiana and southern California. Draft permits have been issued for several of the plants, and differences in the terms and conditions, testing requirements, and permit format and structure have been noted between states. One of the issued permits required modification, and the process was one of the first for this state agency.« less
  • Integrating title IV acid rain and title V operating permits in an efficient manner poses numerous challenges. Federal rules and policy memos about these programs often conflict or lead to actions that are difficult to implement at best. Both permitting programs are complex and controversial, but the title IV permitting rules are particularly difficult to use and understand. Clear lines of jurisdiction for various aspects of the acid rain program are lacking in some cases, and regulators have been slow to recognize and solve these problems. There are numerous issues that have arisen during the initial stages of developing permitsmore » for title IV affected sources. Some have or are being resolved; others remain as potential impediments to efficient permitting. Utah and other western states have been working with the utility industry and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to resolve these and other issues and some problems have been resolved. However, some state and industry officials feel that EPA should take the lead to conduct a series title IV implementation workshops in partnership with states and the utilities. This paper describes solutions to some common implementation problems and identifies challenges that remain to be solved.« less
  • The purpose of this paper is to discuss recent EPA proposed regulations regarding required procedures to be incorporated into the state operating permit programs to accommodate permit revisions. The development and implementation of an operating permits program must balance air pollution control requirements with the ability of a source to meet changing market demands. This has been the major item of concern during the operating permits program development. Before discussing the specific procedures for revising operating permits, it is necessary to include some generic background information for familiarization with the operating permits program.