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Title: Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants

Abstract

Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation ofmore » a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Hydro-Search, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
147990
Report Number(s):
CONF-950152-
TRN: IM9601%%95
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Petro-Safe `95 conference and exhibition, Houston, TX (United States), 31 Jan - 2 Feb 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Petro-safe `95: 6. Annual environmental, safety and health conference and exhibition for the oil, gas and petrochemical industries. Book 1; PB: 590 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANTS; PERMITS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; CLEAN AIR ACTS; COMPLIANCE; POLLUTION SOURCES

Citation Formats

Arend, C. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Arend, C. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants. United States.
Arend, C. 1995. "Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_147990,
title = {Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants},
author = {Arend, C.},
abstractNote = {Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation of a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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