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Title: Optical emission from ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime

Abstract

We perform optical emission spectroscopy of ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime at driving wavelengths of 400 nm and 800 nm. The spatiotemporal structure of the emission from the plasmas are observed and the emission spectra are used to estimate plasma temperature and density for a range of laser parameters. Plasma temperatures are determined from the molecular nitrogen fluorescence, while the electron densities are estimated from Stark broadening of the oxygen-I 777.19-nm line. Electron temperatures are determined to be in the range of 5000–5200 K and they do not vary significantly along the length of the filament, nor are they sensitive to incident laser energy or wavelength. Electron densities are on order of 10 16 cm -3 and show a greater variation with axial position, laser energy, and laser wavelength. We discuss mechanisms responsible for spatial localization of emitting species within the filament. Optical emission spectroscopy offers a simple, non-perturbing method to measure filament properties, that allows the information on the associated molecular transitions and excitation/ionization mechanisms to be extracted.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, Center for Ultrafast Optical Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1478696
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1524438
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002534
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 22; Journal ID: ISSN 1094-4087
Publisher:
Optical Society of America (OSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Finney, L. A., Skrodzki, P. J., Burger, M., Xiao, X., Nees, J., and Jovanovic, I. Optical emission from ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1364/OE.26.029110.
Finney, L. A., Skrodzki, P. J., Burger, M., Xiao, X., Nees, J., & Jovanovic, I. Optical emission from ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime. United States. doi:10.1364/OE.26.029110.
Finney, L. A., Skrodzki, P. J., Burger, M., Xiao, X., Nees, J., and Jovanovic, I. Wed . "Optical emission from ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime". United States. doi:10.1364/OE.26.029110.
@article{osti_1478696,
title = {Optical emission from ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime},
author = {Finney, L. A. and Skrodzki, P. J. and Burger, M. and Xiao, X. and Nees, J. and Jovanovic, I.},
abstractNote = {We perform optical emission spectroscopy of ultrafast laser filament-produced air plasmas in the multiple filament regime at driving wavelengths of 400 nm and 800 nm. The spatiotemporal structure of the emission from the plasmas are observed and the emission spectra are used to estimate plasma temperature and density for a range of laser parameters. Plasma temperatures are determined from the molecular nitrogen fluorescence, while the electron densities are estimated from Stark broadening of the oxygen-I 777.19-nm line. Electron temperatures are determined to be in the range of 5000–5200 K and they do not vary significantly along the length of the filament, nor are they sensitive to incident laser energy or wavelength. Electron densities are on order of 1016 cm-3 and show a greater variation with axial position, laser energy, and laser wavelength. We discuss mechanisms responsible for spatial localization of emitting species within the filament. Optical emission spectroscopy offers a simple, non-perturbing method to measure filament properties, that allows the information on the associated molecular transitions and excitation/ionization mechanisms to be extracted.},
doi = {10.1364/OE.26.029110},
journal = {Optics Express},
issn = {1094-4087},
number = 22,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1364/OE.26.029110

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Schematic of the experimental setup. The inset image shows an example radial profile of the multiple filament cores (bright spots) observed from the damage on a copper target (3 mJ, 400 nm). The copper target is placed near the geometric focus of the spherical mirror.

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Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.