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Title: Adaptation of a visible wavelength fluorescence microplate reader for discovery of near-infrared fluorescent probes

Abstract

In this paper, we present an inexpensive, generalizable approach for modifying visible wavelength fluorescence microplate readers to detect emission in the near-infrared (NIR) I (650–950 nm) and NIR II (1000-1350 nm) tissue imaging windows. These wavelength ranges are promising for high sensitivity fluorescence-based cell assays and biological imaging, but the inaccessibility of NIR microplate readers is limiting development of the requisite, biocompatible fluorescent probes. Our modifications enable rapid screening of NIR candidate probes, using short pulses of UV light to provide excitation of diverse systems including dye molecules, semiconductor quantum dots, and metal clusters. To confirm the utility of our approach for rapid discovery of new NIR probes, we examine the silver cluster synthesis products formed on 375 candidate DNA strands that were originally designed to produce green-emitting, DNA-stabilized silver clusters. The fast, sensitive system developed here discovered DNA strands that unexpectedly stabilize NIR-emitting silver clusters.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1477657
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1473743
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-21199
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Material Science

Citation Formats

Swasey, Steven M., Nicholson, Hunter C., Copp, Stacy M., Bogdanov, Petko, Gorovits, Alexander, and Gwinn, Elisabeth G. Adaptation of a visible wavelength fluorescence microplate reader for discovery of near-infrared fluorescent probes. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5023258.
Swasey, Steven M., Nicholson, Hunter C., Copp, Stacy M., Bogdanov, Petko, Gorovits, Alexander, & Gwinn, Elisabeth G. Adaptation of a visible wavelength fluorescence microplate reader for discovery of near-infrared fluorescent probes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5023258.
Swasey, Steven M., Nicholson, Hunter C., Copp, Stacy M., Bogdanov, Petko, Gorovits, Alexander, and Gwinn, Elisabeth G. Tue . "Adaptation of a visible wavelength fluorescence microplate reader for discovery of near-infrared fluorescent probes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5023258. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477657.
@article{osti_1477657,
title = {Adaptation of a visible wavelength fluorescence microplate reader for discovery of near-infrared fluorescent probes},
author = {Swasey, Steven M. and Nicholson, Hunter C. and Copp, Stacy M. and Bogdanov, Petko and Gorovits, Alexander and Gwinn, Elisabeth G.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we present an inexpensive, generalizable approach for modifying visible wavelength fluorescence microplate readers to detect emission in the near-infrared (NIR) I (650–950 nm) and NIR II (1000-1350 nm) tissue imaging windows. These wavelength ranges are promising for high sensitivity fluorescence-based cell assays and biological imaging, but the inaccessibility of NIR microplate readers is limiting development of the requisite, biocompatible fluorescent probes. Our modifications enable rapid screening of NIR candidate probes, using short pulses of UV light to provide excitation of diverse systems including dye molecules, semiconductor quantum dots, and metal clusters. To confirm the utility of our approach for rapid discovery of new NIR probes, we examine the silver cluster synthesis products formed on 375 candidate DNA strands that were originally designed to produce green-emitting, DNA-stabilized silver clusters. The fast, sensitive system developed here discovered DNA strands that unexpectedly stabilize NIR-emitting silver clusters.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5023258},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
issn = {0034-6748},
number = 9,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 1 work
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Figures / Tables:

FIG. 1. FIG. 1. : (a) Schematic of the instrument adaptation, here applied to a Tecan Infinite 200 Pro microplate reader. The blue box indicates the chassis of the microplate reader. Orange circles indicate elements added for the NIR adaptation. The excitation and emission filters are placed in the filter holder suppliedmore » with the instrument. The InGaAs PIN photodetector is added to the fluorescence detection path using a simple, home-machined cylindrical adapter that contains a focusing lens. The signal cable from the detector passes through the microplate reader chassis to an envelope filter consisting of a 1N4001 diode with an RC filter (R = 1 MΩ, C = 220 nF) that is mounted on a circuit board. A USB-based digitizer records the signal output of the envelope filter. (b) Typical spectrum of a xenon flashlamp with a UV glass or synthetic silica housing, adapted from Hamamatsu’s online spectra (relative intensities vary depending on flashlamp details).« less

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