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Title: A novel method to evaluate nutrient retention by biological soil crust exopolymeric matrix

Abstract

Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are microbial communities commonly found in the upper layer of arid soils. These microorganisms release exopolysaccharides (EPS), which form the exopolymeric matrix (EPM), allowing them to bond soil particles together and survive long periods of dryness. The aim of this paper is to develop methods for measuring metabolite retention by biocrust EPM and EPS. We report new methods for the investigation of metabolite sorption on biocrusts compared to the underlying unconsolidated subcrust fraction. A 13C–labeled bacterial lysate metabolite mixture was incubated with biocrust, subcrust and biocrust-extracted EPS. Non-sorbed metabolites were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. This simple and rapid approach enabled the comparison of metabolite sorption on the biocrust EPM or EPS versus mineral sorption on the underlying soils. Our results suggest that the biocrust (and its extracted EPS) sorb more metabolites, especially amino acids and organic acids, than the underlying subcrust. This study demonstrates a useful method to highlight the essential role of biocrust (especially the EPM), which acts as a passive nutrient filter, sequestering metabolites released by microbes during wetting events. Finally, this may facilitate recovery of the community upon wetting and further enhance biocrust survival and nutrient retention.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology Division
  2. Univ. of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences; CNR Inst. of Ecosystem Study, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)
  3. Univ. of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology Division; USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1477354
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Plant and Soil
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 429; Journal Issue: 1-2; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-079X
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; biological soil crusts; exopolymeric matrix; exopolysaccharides; metabolomics; sorption

Citation Formats

Swenson, Tami L., Couradeau, Estelle, Bowen, Benjamin P., De Philippis, Roberto, Rossi, Federico, Mugnai, Gianmarco, and Northen, Trent R. A novel method to evaluate nutrient retention by biological soil crust exopolymeric matrix. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3537-x.
Swenson, Tami L., Couradeau, Estelle, Bowen, Benjamin P., De Philippis, Roberto, Rossi, Federico, Mugnai, Gianmarco, & Northen, Trent R. A novel method to evaluate nutrient retention by biological soil crust exopolymeric matrix. United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3537-x.
Swenson, Tami L., Couradeau, Estelle, Bowen, Benjamin P., De Philippis, Roberto, Rossi, Federico, Mugnai, Gianmarco, and Northen, Trent R. Fri . "A novel method to evaluate nutrient retention by biological soil crust exopolymeric matrix". United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3537-x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477354.
@article{osti_1477354,
title = {A novel method to evaluate nutrient retention by biological soil crust exopolymeric matrix},
author = {Swenson, Tami L. and Couradeau, Estelle and Bowen, Benjamin P. and De Philippis, Roberto and Rossi, Federico and Mugnai, Gianmarco and Northen, Trent R.},
abstractNote = {Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are microbial communities commonly found in the upper layer of arid soils. These microorganisms release exopolysaccharides (EPS), which form the exopolymeric matrix (EPM), allowing them to bond soil particles together and survive long periods of dryness. The aim of this paper is to develop methods for measuring metabolite retention by biocrust EPM and EPS. We report new methods for the investigation of metabolite sorption on biocrusts compared to the underlying unconsolidated subcrust fraction. A 13C–labeled bacterial lysate metabolite mixture was incubated with biocrust, subcrust and biocrust-extracted EPS. Non-sorbed metabolites were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. This simple and rapid approach enabled the comparison of metabolite sorption on the biocrust EPM or EPS versus mineral sorption on the underlying soils. Our results suggest that the biocrust (and its extracted EPS) sorb more metabolites, especially amino acids and organic acids, than the underlying subcrust. This study demonstrates a useful method to highlight the essential role of biocrust (especially the EPM), which acts as a passive nutrient filter, sequestering metabolites released by microbes during wetting events. Finally, this may facilitate recovery of the community upon wetting and further enhance biocrust survival and nutrient retention.},
doi = {10.1007/s11104-017-3537-x},
journal = {Plant and Soil},
issn = {0032-079X},
number = 1-2,
volume = 429,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
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Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Workflow used to examine sorption of bacterial metabolites on biocrust, subcrust and EPS. Biocrust from a dark successional stage was separated from the underlying subcrust layer and EPS was extracted from the biocrust. Samples were incubated with 13C bacterial metabolites for 15 min and non-sorbed metabolites were extractedmore » with water and analyzed by LC/MS. Data were compared to controls containing either 13C bacterial metabolites only or soils/EPS only to determine (percent)metabolite sorption.« less

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Biocrusts: the living skin of the earth
    journal, July 2018

    • Bowker, Matthew A.; Reed, Sasha C.; Maestre, Fernando T.
    • Plant and Soil, Vol. 429, Issue 1-2
    • DOI: 10.1007/s11104-018-3735-1

      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.