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Title: Ocular Pathogens, Eye Infections, and Cosmetics Periodic Update (July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017)

Abstract

A PubMed literature search was conducted to support analyses and investigations of the relationship between microorganisms associated with human eye infections (including opportunistic pathogens) and cosmetics. Key terms for PubMed literature searches included; microbial genera and species of interest (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, parasites), opportunistic pathogens, human eye disease and infection, human ocular infections, specific eye diseases (keratitis, conjunctivitis, etc.), eye accidents, eye surgery, contacts, infants, pregnant women, geriatric, immunocompromised, HIV and polymicrobial. The number of journal articles for defined searches was summarized and journal citations and abstracts were cataloged and incorporated into a searchable information system (MS Access). A periodic update to the literature searches was conducted in July 2017 and observations from the update indicate the most commonly associated bacteria with eye infections/diseases were Staphylococcus sp., Chlamydia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. Also, the literature searches indicate the most commonly associated fungi with eye infections/diseases were Fusarium sp., Aspergillus sp. and Candida sp. A relative rank of occurrence of microorganisms associated with eye infections/disease in the literature citations was; Staphylococcus aureus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes zoster virus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acanthamoeba sp., Fusarium sp., E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Literature searches for opportunistic microorganisms and emerging pathogens formore » this update identified several articles on fungi, Bacillus sp. (primarily B. cereus), Haemophilus influenzae and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) associated with eye infections/diseases. Although the literature searches focused on microorganisms, key eye diseases noted in the citations were keratitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, endophthalmitis and keratoconjunctivitis.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1476414
Report Number(s):
ORNL/LTR-2018/916
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Armstrong, Anthony Q., Goldberg, Jennifer L., Langston, Marilyn E., and Glass-Mattie, Dana F. Ocular Pathogens, Eye Infections, and Cosmetics Periodic Update (July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1476414.
Armstrong, Anthony Q., Goldberg, Jennifer L., Langston, Marilyn E., & Glass-Mattie, Dana F. Ocular Pathogens, Eye Infections, and Cosmetics Periodic Update (July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017). United States. doi:10.2172/1476414.
Armstrong, Anthony Q., Goldberg, Jennifer L., Langston, Marilyn E., and Glass-Mattie, Dana F. Sun . "Ocular Pathogens, Eye Infections, and Cosmetics Periodic Update (July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017)". United States. doi:10.2172/1476414. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1476414.
@article{osti_1476414,
title = {Ocular Pathogens, Eye Infections, and Cosmetics Periodic Update (July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017)},
author = {Armstrong, Anthony Q. and Goldberg, Jennifer L. and Langston, Marilyn E. and Glass-Mattie, Dana F.},
abstractNote = {A PubMed literature search was conducted to support analyses and investigations of the relationship between microorganisms associated with human eye infections (including opportunistic pathogens) and cosmetics. Key terms for PubMed literature searches included; microbial genera and species of interest (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, parasites), opportunistic pathogens, human eye disease and infection, human ocular infections, specific eye diseases (keratitis, conjunctivitis, etc.), eye accidents, eye surgery, contacts, infants, pregnant women, geriatric, immunocompromised, HIV and polymicrobial. The number of journal articles for defined searches was summarized and journal citations and abstracts were cataloged and incorporated into a searchable information system (MS Access). A periodic update to the literature searches was conducted in July 2017 and observations from the update indicate the most commonly associated bacteria with eye infections/diseases were Staphylococcus sp., Chlamydia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. Also, the literature searches indicate the most commonly associated fungi with eye infections/diseases were Fusarium sp., Aspergillus sp. and Candida sp. A relative rank of occurrence of microorganisms associated with eye infections/disease in the literature citations was; Staphylococcus aureus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes zoster virus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acanthamoeba sp., Fusarium sp., E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Literature searches for opportunistic microorganisms and emerging pathogens for this update identified several articles on fungi, Bacillus sp. (primarily B. cereus), Haemophilus influenzae and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) associated with eye infections/diseases. Although the literature searches focused on microorganisms, key eye diseases noted in the citations were keratitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, endophthalmitis and keratoconjunctivitis.},
doi = {10.2172/1476414},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

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