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Title: Low temperature hydrogenation of pyrolytic lignin over Ru/TiO 2: 2D HSQC and 13C NMR study of reactants and products

Abstract

In this paper, pyrolytic lignin and hydrogenated pyrolytic lignin were characterized by 2D 1H– 13C HSQC and quantitative 13C NMR techniques. The pyrolytic lignin was produced from a mixed maple wood feedstock and separated from the bio-oil by water extraction. p-Hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) aromatics were the basic units of pyrolytic lignin. The native lignin β-aryl ether, phenylcoumaran and resinol structures were not present in the pyrolytic lignin. The hydrogenation was conducted with a Ru/TiO 2 catalyst at temperatures ranging from 25–150 °C with higher temperatures exhibiting higher levels of hydrogenation. Solid coke formed on the catalyst surface (1% coke yield) even for hydrogenation at 25 °C. The carbon yield of pyrolytic lignin to coke increased from 1% to 5% as the hydrogenation temperature increased from 25 to 150 °C. A single-step hydrogenation at 150 °C resulted in a reduction from 65% to 39% aromatic carbons. A three-step hydrogenation scheme at this same temperature resulted in a reduction of aromatic carbons from 65% to 17%. The decrease in the aromatic carbon corresponded with an increase in the aliphatic carbon. Coke formation reduced from a 5% carbon yield of pyrolytic lignin in the first hydrogenation step to amore » 1% carbon yield in each of the second and third hydrogenation steps. The pyrolytic lignin could be separated into a high and low molecular weight fraction. Finally, the coke yield from the high molecular weight fraction was twice as much as that from the low molecular weight fraction.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). State Key Lab. of Clean Energy Utilization; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  3. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry. DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center. Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
  4. Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). State Key Lab. of Clean Energy Utilization
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC); Major State Basic Research Development Program of China; China Scholarship Council
OSTI Identifier:
1475424
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-07ER64494; 51336008; 2013CB228100
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Green Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1463-9262
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Chen, Wen, McClelland, Daniel J., Azarpira, Ali, Ralph, John, Luo, Zhongyang, and Huber, George W. Low temperature hydrogenation of pyrolytic lignin over Ru/TiO2: 2D HSQC and 13C NMR study of reactants and products. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1039/C5GC02286J.
Chen, Wen, McClelland, Daniel J., Azarpira, Ali, Ralph, John, Luo, Zhongyang, & Huber, George W. Low temperature hydrogenation of pyrolytic lignin over Ru/TiO2: 2D HSQC and 13C NMR study of reactants and products. United States. doi:10.1039/C5GC02286J.
Chen, Wen, McClelland, Daniel J., Azarpira, Ali, Ralph, John, Luo, Zhongyang, and Huber, George W. Thu . "Low temperature hydrogenation of pyrolytic lignin over Ru/TiO2: 2D HSQC and 13C NMR study of reactants and products". United States. doi:10.1039/C5GC02286J. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1475424.
@article{osti_1475424,
title = {Low temperature hydrogenation of pyrolytic lignin over Ru/TiO2: 2D HSQC and 13C NMR study of reactants and products},
author = {Chen, Wen and McClelland, Daniel J. and Azarpira, Ali and Ralph, John and Luo, Zhongyang and Huber, George W.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, pyrolytic lignin and hydrogenated pyrolytic lignin were characterized by 2D 1H–13C HSQC and quantitative 13C NMR techniques. The pyrolytic lignin was produced from a mixed maple wood feedstock and separated from the bio-oil by water extraction. p-Hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) aromatics were the basic units of pyrolytic lignin. The native lignin β-aryl ether, phenylcoumaran and resinol structures were not present in the pyrolytic lignin. The hydrogenation was conducted with a Ru/TiO2 catalyst at temperatures ranging from 25–150 °C with higher temperatures exhibiting higher levels of hydrogenation. Solid coke formed on the catalyst surface (1% coke yield) even for hydrogenation at 25 °C. The carbon yield of pyrolytic lignin to coke increased from 1% to 5% as the hydrogenation temperature increased from 25 to 150 °C. A single-step hydrogenation at 150 °C resulted in a reduction from 65% to 39% aromatic carbons. A three-step hydrogenation scheme at this same temperature resulted in a reduction of aromatic carbons from 65% to 17%. The decrease in the aromatic carbon corresponded with an increase in the aliphatic carbon. Coke formation reduced from a 5% carbon yield of pyrolytic lignin in the first hydrogenation step to a 1% carbon yield in each of the second and third hydrogenation steps. The pyrolytic lignin could be separated into a high and low molecular weight fraction. Finally, the coke yield from the high molecular weight fraction was twice as much as that from the low molecular weight fraction.},
doi = {10.1039/C5GC02286J},
journal = {Green Chemistry},
issn = {1463-9262},
number = 1,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}

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Cited by: 15 works
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Works referenced in this record:

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