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Title: Kelvin probe force microscopy for high-resolution imaging of hydrogen in steel alloys [Poster]

Abstract

Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was used to image and co-locate the presence of hydrogen in stainless steel (SS) with microstructure. Various SS samples were investigated, including forged, welded, LENS® fabricated, and pinch welded materials. KPFM images the local work function of a surface as a function of spatial position using atomic force microscopy. KPFM is capable of delivering high spatial (~10 nm) and potential (~5mV) resolution maps characterizing the microstrucure and the locally varying work function of surfaces. Hydrogen segregated at the surface of SS increases the local work function by either reducing tensile strain or by reducing the chemical potential of surface species. In a process known as hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen segregates to and becomes trapped at extended defects (e.g. dislocations, boundaries, pores) which leads to the initiation of cracking and can result in structural failure. Hydrogen storage necessitates a proper understanding of the mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement in SS. Developing advanced characterization techniques for hydrogen embrittlement is critical to identify long term solutions for materials exposed to hydrogen. Current techniques of observing hydrogen embrittlement involve mechanical testing, and optical microscopy with low resolution. Advance microstructural imaging techniques capable of resolving features down to the nanometer scale aremore » needed. KPFM provides high resolution imaging for the characterization and development of SS components for hydrogen storage.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River National Lab (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1475273
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2018-00535
TRN: US1902610
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Duncan, Andrew, McNamara, Joy, Morgan, Michael, and Korinko, Paul. Kelvin probe force microscopy for high-resolution imaging of hydrogen in steel alloys [Poster]. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1475273.
Duncan, Andrew, McNamara, Joy, Morgan, Michael, & Korinko, Paul. Kelvin probe force microscopy for high-resolution imaging of hydrogen in steel alloys [Poster]. United States. doi:10.2172/1475273.
Duncan, Andrew, McNamara, Joy, Morgan, Michael, and Korinko, Paul. Tue . "Kelvin probe force microscopy for high-resolution imaging of hydrogen in steel alloys [Poster]". United States. doi:10.2172/1475273. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1475273.
@article{osti_1475273,
title = {Kelvin probe force microscopy for high-resolution imaging of hydrogen in steel alloys [Poster]},
author = {Duncan, Andrew and McNamara, Joy and Morgan, Michael and Korinko, Paul},
abstractNote = {Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was used to image and co-locate the presence of hydrogen in stainless steel (SS) with microstructure. Various SS samples were investigated, including forged, welded, LENS® fabricated, and pinch welded materials. KPFM images the local work function of a surface as a function of spatial position using atomic force microscopy. KPFM is capable of delivering high spatial (~10 nm) and potential (~5mV) resolution maps characterizing the microstrucure and the locally varying work function of surfaces. Hydrogen segregated at the surface of SS increases the local work function by either reducing tensile strain or by reducing the chemical potential of surface species. In a process known as hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen segregates to and becomes trapped at extended defects (e.g. dislocations, boundaries, pores) which leads to the initiation of cracking and can result in structural failure. Hydrogen storage necessitates a proper understanding of the mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement in SS. Developing advanced characterization techniques for hydrogen embrittlement is critical to identify long term solutions for materials exposed to hydrogen. Current techniques of observing hydrogen embrittlement involve mechanical testing, and optical microscopy with low resolution. Advance microstructural imaging techniques capable of resolving features down to the nanometer scale are needed. KPFM provides high resolution imaging for the characterization and development of SS components for hydrogen storage.},
doi = {10.2172/1475273},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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